Printable Version

Sale 5127

The "Patrick" Collection
of Naval Militaria, History & Related


Pre-Civil War




Lot Photo Description
Lot 3001

U.S.S. Boston, Sloop of War, folded letter to Baltimore endorsed "pr. U. S. Ship Boston" after crossing out original endorsement "Brig James Lawrence, Capt Lane", postmarked with a partial red New York c.d.s. and matching straightline "SHIP" with a red manuscript "20½" rate; datelined "Buenos Aires the 10 April 1829"; the letter, from Capt. Matthew Robinson to his wife, mentions local "civil wars - nothing but robbing and murder all over the provinces. It is not safe to be in the streets after dark."; small tape stain at the top and a bit of internal splitting, about Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Boston was launched on October 15, 1825, and served all around the world. She returned to the U.S. in 1846 and was ordered to join Commodore Conner's Home Squadron blockading the Mexican east coast. While en route to her new station, in November 1846, she was wrecked during a squall on Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. Although the sloop was a total loss, all hands were saved.
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Lot 3002

U.S.S. Brandywine, Frigate, 1840 folded letter from Philadelphia to "Lieutenant John Kelly, United States Ship Brandywine, Mediterranean Squadron, Care of Fitch Brothers & Co./Gibraltar, Marseilles, France" and endorsed "First Havre packet, New York", postmarked with a blue Apr 22 Philadelphia c.d.s. and matching boxed "PAID" with a manuscript "12" rate along with a red Apl 23 New York c.d.s.; red Havre entry c.d.s. and manuscript "19" (centimes due), backstamped Paris (May 21) and Marseille (May 24); the letter is from Kelly's wife and daughter, F.-V.F. An unusual destination for an American warship., .
Suggested Bid $75


Originally built in 1825 as the 44-gun frigate,
Susquehanna , her first task was to transport the Marquis de Lafayette back to France. She was renamed Brandywine in honor of the battle in which Lafayette was wounded while fighting with American forces. She was later recommissioned a number of times for service in various theaters, finally in October 1861, when she joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, most of the time stationed off of Fortress Monroe.
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Lot 3003

U.S.S. Columbus, Ship of the Line, folded letter datelined "U. S. Ship Columbus, Callao [Peru] Jan. 6th. 1847", to the Naval Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y. and postmarked with a nice strike of a red Apr 28 "NEW-YORK SHIP/7 cts" c.d.s.; some toning on an inside edge of the letter obscures the name of the sender, still Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $75


Columbus served as flagship for the Mediterranean, Brazilian and East Indies Squadrons. She was burned at Norfolk as the Rebel Army approached.

The addressee, Dr. William Ruschenberger, was a noted surgeon and author who reached the rank of Commodore and authored more than 30 books on science, medicine and foreign travels.

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Lot 3004

U.S.S. Concord, Sloop of War, folded letter headed "U S Ship Concord, Portsmouth, N.H." to the U.S. Navy Agent at the Boston Navy Yard postmarked with a red Dec 6 "PORTSMo., N.H." c.d.s. with a matching "SHIP" and a manuscript "22" rate, docketed 1832; slightly soiled and letter faded, Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Concord was commissioned in May 1830 and served in the Mediterranean from April 1830 until December 1832. In 1835 she sent to the Western Florida coast during the Second Seminole War, sometimes providing crewmen to aid in ground fighting. Then she served along the Mexican coast, in the West Indies and off of Brazil protecting American commerce, as well as in the Indian Ocean off of Mozambique and Madagascar protecting American whaling ships. In November 1842 she ran aground in Mozambique and was abandoned.
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Lot 3005

U.S.S. Constellation, Frigate, folded letter datelined "U.S.S. Constellation, Norfolk, Va. 1 Dec. 1834", postmarked with a clear Dec 3 Portsmouth, Va. c.d.s., sent free "on public service" to the Navy Agent at Boston regarding an accounting matter, Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


The 38-gun
Constellation, built in 1797, served in many conflicts including the War of 1812 and, with Commodore Stephen Decatur's Squadron in the Second Barbary War in the Mediterranean. She also served in the Pacific and the Caribbean as part of the West Indies Squadron.
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Lot 3006

U.S.S. Cumberland, Frigate, folded letter with manuscript endorsement "US Ship Cumberland" and datelined Leghorn [Livorno], Mar 24, 1853; postmarked "5/N. York Br. Pkt/Apr 20" upon arrival in New York, other postmarks (front & back) La Spezia (Apr 1) & "P.D.", Torino (Apr 2), and French transit (Apr 5); the letter, regarding ship's accounts, is addressed to "Commander H.B. Sawyer" in Washington D.C., F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $70


Cumberland, a sail-only frigate, was launched in November 1842 and served as Flagship for the Pacific, European and Home Squadrons. She was Perry's Flagship at the opening of Japan in 1852. She was rammed and sunk in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (formerly the U.S.S. Merrimack) at Newport News, Va., on March 8, 1862. The engagement, on the first day of the Battle of Hampton Roads, is considered to be a turning point in the history of naval warfare, as it demonstrated the advantage of steam-powered, armored ships over sail-powered, wooden-hulled ships.
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Lot 3007

U.S.S. Delaware, Ship of the Line, folded letter to Norwich, Ct. datelined "U.S.S. Delaware, Off Cape Henry [Virginia] Nov 1", postmarked with a red Nov 2 c.d.s. and matching straightline "SHIP" with a manuscript "27" rate, docketed 1841; letter to the sailor's uncle, begins "We are at sea at last, if off Cape Henry may be so counted.".
Suggested Bid $50


Delaware was commissioned in 1828 and served off and on in the Mediterranean until returning to Hampton Roads in 1836 to be decommissioned. She was recommissioned for local operations in 1841 and later that year joined the Brazil Station where she patrolled the coasts of Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina. She returned to Norfolk in 1844, was decommissioned, and it was there, in 1861, that she was burned to prevent her from falling into Confederate hands.
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Lot 3008

U.S.S. Fairfield, Sloop of War, folded letter datelined "U. S. Ship Fairfield, Norfolk April 21 1837", postmarked with a red Apr 21 Norfolk c.d.s. and matching straightline "SHIP" with a faded manuscript "25" rate, to the Navy Agent at Boston regarding an accounting matter, Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Fairfield launched in 1828. She cruised the Mediterranean until 1831, then served as flagship in the West Indies and, in 1833 joined the Pacific Squadron. She was at Norfolk from September 1835 until April 1837 when she was assigned to the Brazil Station as a protector for American commerce guarding against the blockade of Argentina by French warships. In May 1841 she again cruised the Mediterranean and continued in service until January 1845 finishing her career at Norfolk.
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Lot 3009

U.S.S. Franklin, Ship of the Line, folded letter to Philadelphia datelined "U. S. Ship Franklin, Boston January 21st 1849", postmarked with a somewhat faded red Jan 22 "BOSTON/10 cts" c.d.s.; letter is from three sailors from the U.S.S. Savannah who are aboard the Franklin while Savannah is in Dry Dock for repairs. It mentions that they "will be going out under command of Capt. Voorhees, who was tried by a court martial and put back six years in rank for cruelty on board the Congress…"; edge flaws, about Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Franklin sailed her first cruise in October 1817 to the Mediterranean, where she served as flagship until 1820. From 1821 to 1824 she was assigned as flagship for the Pacific Squadron. She lay in ordinary until 1838 when she was ordered to Boston to serve as receiving ship until 1852 when she was taken to Portsmouth and broken up. Interestingly, parts of her were used in her successor the steam frigate Franklin.
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Lot 3010

U.S.S. Guerriere, Frigate, folded letter to Philadelphia datelined "U. S. Frigate Guerriere, Off Callao [Peru] August 22d '29", postmarked on arrival with a red Mar 15 c.d.s. and matching straightline "SHIP" with a manuscript "14½" rate (12½¢ inland + 2¢ ship fee); from Philadelphia the letter was forwarded to the Washington Navy Yard with a brown Mar 18 Philadelphia c.d.s. and manuscript "12½"; letter a little faded, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $50


Guerriere was launched in 1814 and attached to the Delaware Flotilla. In 1815 she was transferred to serve as the flagship for Captain Stephen Decatur's squadron during the Second Barbary War protecting American commerce from piracy from Algiers and other Barbary States. A treaty with Algiers was negotiated on board and she then led the squadron in a show of force, resulting in peace treaties with Tunis and Tripoli. For seven years she served as a training ship at the Norfolk Naval Yard, before the Naval Academy was established. In 1828 she was ordered out to serve as flagship of the Navy squadron headed for the Pacific and was decommissioned in 1831.
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Lot 3011

U.S.S. Hudson, Frigate, folded letter datelined "U. S. Ship Hudson, Rio de Janeiro 7 Sepr 1830", addressed to the U.S. Navy Agent at the Boston Navy Yard per the "Brig Virginia", entered the mails at New York with a red Oct 28 c.d.s., a matching straightline "SHIP" and a manuscript "20"; heavy vertical file folds and repaired internal tear, about Fine. From Hudson's purser, John de Bree, reporting an allotment to Gunner Samuel Allen for "3 Mo @ $17.", .
Suggested Bid $50


The 44-gun frigate,
Hudson, originally built for the Greek government and named the Liberator, was purchased by the U.S. Navy in 1826 when Greece could not pay the contract. She set sail in 1828 as flagship for the Brazil Squadron and helped eradicate the slave trade off Brazil. She conducted several patrols along the South American coast and served time as harbor patrol in Montevideo and Rio de Janeiro. In 1831 she returned home to New York where she served as a receiving ship until 1844 when she was broken up and sold.
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Lot 3012

U.S.S. John Adams, Frigate, folded cover addressed to "Mid. Robert Townsend, Sloop of War John Adams, Norfolk, Va.", postmarked with a faint red Dec 29 Albany, N.Y. c.d.s., a matching straightline "PAID" and a red manuscript "25"; slight faults, about Fine. The year would have been 1838 or 1839, after which Townsend was transferred to the U.S.S. Ohio, .
Suggested Bid $50


John Adams, with a complement of 220, was commissioned in 1799. She had a long and storied career before joining the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She served as the flagship for the inner blockade at Charleston until the city was evacuated and she entered the harbor.
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Lot 3013

U.S.S. Lexington, Sloop of War, folded letter datelined "US Ship Lexington, Norfolk 20th Nov. 1830", postmarked with red Nov 22 "NORFk. Va." c.d.s. and matching straightline "SHIP" with a faded manuscript "27" rate, to the Navy Agent at Boston regarding an accounting matter, Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Lexington, commissioned in 1826, was first stationed off Labrador to protect American fishing vessels. She then served in the Mediterranean Sea and the South Atlantic. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico in 1846 she operated along the west coast of North America, transporting troops and assisting in the blockade. After the war she continued cruising the California coast until the early days of the Gold Rush in 1849. In 1853 she joined Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan.
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Lot 3014

U.S.S. Merrimack, Steam Frigate, cover with manuscript endorsement "Pr Frigate Merrimack" postmarked with a blue Norfolk, Va. c.d.s., Feb 6, 1860, with a matching straightline "SHIP" and handstamped "5", to Milton Lower Mills, Mass.; the enclosed, easily-read letter, datelined "Rio de Janeiro Dec 21st 1859", tells of local food, etc., but also notes, "I shall try to get this ready to go by the Frigate Merrimac, that goes on Saturday."; slight edge faults, F.-V.F. This was Merrimack's last voyage as a Union ship before being rebuilt as the Confederate ironclad, C.S.S. Virginia, .
Suggested Bid $75


Merrimack, often misspelled "Merrimac", was launched in 1855 and served throughout the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific (she was flagship of Pacific Squadron). She was decommissioned in 1860 and lay at Norfolk until April 1861 when she was set afire by the Navy upon their evacuation of the Navy Yard. However, she didn't burn entirely and was raised by the Confederates, who were desperate for ships of any kind, and rebuilt as the ironclad ram Virginia.
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Lot 3015

U.S.S. Mississippi, Side-Wheel Frigate, folded letter to New York datelined "U. S. Steamer Mississippi, Sacraficios. [Mexico] 12 Nov. 1847", postmarked with a Nov 24 New Orleans c.d.s. and handstamped "10"; forwarded to to Newark, N.J. with a red Dec 4 New York c.d.s. and matching "FORWARDED" with a blue manuscript "5" added to the "10" and totaled to "15"; the letter, entirely in the hand of Commander Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, is to a Professor Mapes, informing him of the death of a relative, Assistant Engineer Charles A. Mapes.; small tape stain at the top, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $100


Mississippi was Commodore Mathew Perry's flagship for his historic mission to open Japan. At New Orleans, after passing Forts Jackson and St. Phillip, she ran the Conderate Ram Manassas ashore, wrecking her with two broadsides. She was ordered upriver for the operations against Port Hudson, where she grounded and was fired by her crew to prevent capture.

Commander Mackenzie was famous for his 1842 decision to execute three suspected mutineers aboard the U.S.S.
Somers while under his command. The "Somers Mutiny", an interesting chapter in Naval History, is the only mutiny aboard a U.S. Navy ship to result in an execution. Mackenzie was also an accomplished travel writer and Naval biographer, who mingled with literary Americans including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and fellow New Yorker and lifelong friend, Washington Irving.
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Lot 3016

U.S.S. North Carolina, Ship of the Line, folded letter datelined "U.S.S. N. Carolina, April 30th 1848" postmarked with a red Apr 29 New York c.d.s., from North Carolina's Commander, Joshua R Sands, to New York Congressman William B. Maclay in Washington D.C.; the two-page letter, entirely in Sand's hand, is a letter of recommendation (for a pension?) for a Veteran of the War of 1812, one William McCollocks, Very Fine. The letter, being addressed to Member of Congress, was handled postage-free, .
Suggested Bid $100


North Carolina was commissioned in 1824 and served as flagship of the Mediterranean and Pacific Squadrons. She was New York's receiving ship from 1839 until replaced by the Vermont in 1866.

Joshua Ratoon Sands was promoted to Captain in 1854 and was involved with laying the Trans-Atlantic telegraph cable in 1857. In 1861 he was transferred to the retired list and was promoted in retirement to Commodore in 1862 and Rear Admiral in 1866. He continued active duty, serving as Union Lighthouse Inspector on Lakes Erie and Ontario and the St. Lawrence River during the Civil War, and as Port Admiral at Norfolk, Va., from 1869 to 1872.

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Lot 3017

U.S.S. Ontario, Sloop of War, folded letter datelined "U. S. Ship Ontario, Norfolk Nov 5th 1853" and postmarked with a red Nov 15 Norfolk, Va. c.d.s. and matching straightline "SHIP" with a faint manuscript "27"(?) rate; the letter is from Ontario's Purser to the U.S. Navy Agent at the Boston Navy Yard concerning accounting matters; minor toning, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $50


Ontairo was built in Baltimore in 1813. She blockaded in the Chesapeake Bay through the War of 1812. She was part of Commodore Stephen Decatur's Squadron sent to stop the piracy of the Barbary states. She served on blockade duties off Algiers until the signing of a peace treaty, then spent time in the Pacific under Captain James Biddle who succeeded in securing the release of captured U.S. ships. She served several deployments in the Mediterranean and in the West Indies, protecting U.S. commerce from pirates. In July 1843 she returned to Baltimore and began duty as a Navy Yard receiving ship until decommissioned in 1856.
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Lot 3018

U.S.S. Plymouth, Sloop of War, cover from Liverpool, England, Aug 13, 1858, to "Alexr. Duncan, on board of the U. S. R. Ship Ohio, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass., U. States of America or Elsewhere", postmarked with a red Aug 26 "N. YORK 24 BR. PKT." c.d.s. upon arrival in New York, but once at the Boston Navy Yard, it is discovered that Duncan has been transferred to the Plymouth; the cover is then readdressed accordingly to the "U.S. Ship Plymouth, Elsewhere" and marked "Please Forward" and handstamped with a red "5/CENTS", F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $100


Plymouth was with Matthew Perry's expedition to open Japan to U.S. trade. She was at Norfolk for repairs when the secession crisis occurred and was burned and scuttled to prevent capture.
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Lot 3019

U.S.S. Porpoise, Top Sail Schooner, folded letter datelined "U. S. Schr. Porpoise, Port Praia" (Cape Verde) and postmarked fancy red ribbon "SHIP/6"; the letter is from Porpoise's Purser to the U.S. Navy Agent at the Boston Navy Yard concerning an accounting oversight; minor toning, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $50


Porpoise was built in 1820 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard and cruised the West Indies hunting pirates from 1821-23. From 1824-25 she cruised the coast of West Africa engaging in the suppression of the slave trade. In 1827 she took part in rescuing the British merchant brig Comet from Mediterranean pirates. In 1833, while cruising in the West Indies, she was wrecked on a reef off Point Lizardo.
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Lot 3020

U.S.S. Potomac, Frigate, folded letter to New York datelined "U.S. Frigate Potomac, Rio Janeiro Septr 18th 1840", postmarked with a blue Nov 13 New Orleans c.d.s. and partial matching straightline "SHIP" with a red manuscript "27" rate; three-page letter mostly routine but talks about "…the large French fleet daily expected from Cherbourg to intimidate or capture Buenos Ayres.", F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $75


Potomac was commissioned in 1830. She served with the Pacific and Brazilian Squadrons before becoming the flagship of the Home Squadron. At the start of the Civil War she was assigned to the Gulf Blockading Squadron, later becoming a store ship, and then the receiving ship for the East Gulf Blockading Squadron at Pensacola.
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Lot 3021

U.S.S. Preble, Sloop of War, folded letter datelined "United States Sloop of War Preble, At Sea, April 10th 1844" with a second section datelined "Port Royal W.I. [Jamaica] April 15 1844", mailed as an enclosure in a separate folded address leaf postmarked with a blue Dec 21 c.d.s. with matching "PAID" and "10", to Hazlewood, S.C.; a beautifully written letter by one H.G.D. Brown describing Prebles' tour of the Caribbean and Central America with many almost-poetic passages such as, "Our gallant little ship is darting with the rapidity of a Dolphin and proudly dashing the spray from around her bows as if spurning the water which dares impede her progress.", F.-V.F. The letter was apparently not posted until Preble returned from her Caribbean cruise in late 1844., .
Suggested Bid $75


Preble was commissioned in 1840. She operated with the Gulf Blockading Squadron blockading the Mississippi River before being assigned to the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. She was a guard ship for Pensacola in April 1863 when she caught fire, exploded and sank.
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Lot 3022

U.S.S. St. Louis, Sloop, cover to the U.S. Navy Yard, New York with original letter datelined "U. S. Ship St Louis, At Sea [in the Atlantic on the way to Brazil], Oct 15th 1848"; the cover is postmarked with a red Dec 14 Boston c.d.s., a matching straightline "SHIP" and handstamped "7" due; the letter tells of the voyage - the ship reaches Rio de Janeiro on Oct 13, before the letter is finished - and of the writer's less-than-flattering view of the Captain; cover with slight edge wear, F.-V.F., Ex-Walske.
Suggested Bid $50


St. Louis, commissioned in 1828, served in the West Indies Squadron, the Pacific Squadron, and the East India Squadron. She operated in Cadiz and Lisbon from 1862 to 1864 and finished the war with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
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Lot 3023

U.S.S. Saratoga, Sloop of War, folded letter from China to Andover, Mass. endorsed "U.S.S. Saratoga China" and datelined "U. S. Ship Saratoga, Cumsingmun [a harbor east of Macao] September 1st 1851", postmarked with slightly blurry Dec 24 "NEW-YORK/SHIP/7cts" c.d.s.; the letter, to the sailor's brother, notes they are awaiting the arrival of Commodore John Aulick in the Susquehanna, after which they would "probably be sent round to Shanghai, Amoy, Manila, &c.", Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $100


Saratoga started life as the flagship of Matthew Perry's Ivory Coast Expedition, then participated in the Mexican War and was with Perry for the opening of Japan. In the Civil War she served as a guard ship, then joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
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Lot 3024

U.S.S. Saratoga, Sloop of War, 3¢ red entire (U10) addressed to "Lieut. John C. Cash, U. S. Ship Saratoga, Warrington P.O. Florida", postmarked with a clear Washington D.C. c.d.s., Feb 16, 1856; Saratoga was probably stationed at the nearby Pensacola Navy Yard at this time.
Suggested Bid $75


Saratoga began service as the flagship of Matthew Perry's Ivory Coast Expedition, then participated in the Mexican War and was with Perry for the opening of Japan. In the Civil War she served as a guard ship, then joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron performing blockading operations.
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Lot 3025

U.S.S. Susquehanna, Side-Wheel Frigate, 1856 cover addressed to "Lieutenant S. Ledyard Phelps, United States Navy, Steam Frigate Susquehanna, Spezia, Sardinia", light penciled endorsement "To be pre paid 5 cts" at the upper left, postmarked with red handstamped "PAID" and "5" and, on the reverse, "Boston Am. Pkt., 1 Aug" and "Boston Br. Pkt., Aug 5", with an illegible (New York?) c.d.s. on the front; the cover would have left New York on Aug 6 aboard the Steamer Persia, passing through Liverpool on Aug 15, Calais Aug 16, and Genoa, Aug 19, before arriving in Spezia on Aug 20, where it was marked with a manuscript "17" (decimi due); contemporaneous ink smear at the top, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $100


Susquehanna served in the East India Squadron from 1850 to 1855 and in the Mediterranean from 1856 to 1861. During the Civil War, she served the North Atlantic, South Atlantic and West Gulf Blockading Squadrons. In addition to blockading duty, she was at Hatteras Inlet, Port Royal and Hampton Roads.

During the Civil War, Seth Ledyard Phelps, the addressee, commanded the timberclads U.S.S.
Conestoga, Tyler and Lexington in the Mississippi River Flotilla and was later the U.S. Minister to Peru.
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Lot 3026

U.S.S. United States, Frigate, cover to Middletown, Ct. with manuscript endorsement "U. S. Frigate United States, Monrovia [Liberia] December 15th 1846", postmarked with a blue Apr 7 Baltimore c.d.s. with matching straightline "SHIP" and handstamped "12"; inconsequential mounting tape stain on the reverse, otherwise exceptionally clean, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $100


The
United States was one of the original six frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794. She participated in the War of 1812, patrolling waters of the Caribbean. She was sent to the Mediterranean to participate in the Second Barbary War but by the time she got there a peace treaty had already been signed. In addition to several tours in the Mediterranean, United States also served in the Home Squadron, the Pacific Squadron, and the African Squadron, returning to Norfolk to be decommissioned in 1849, where she remained, basically allowed to rot away, until 1861 when the Navy Yard was captured by Confederate troops. She was refit by the Confederates to serve as harbor defense at Norfolk as the C.S.S. United States.

Notably, Herman Melville, author of
Moby Dick, enlisted as an ordinary seaman on while she was docked at Honolulu in 1843.
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Lot 3027

U.S.S. Wabash, Colorado-Class Screw Frigate, cover addressed to "Dr. G.R.B. Horner, Fleet Surgeon, U. S. Steam Ship Wabash, Aspinwall, Central America" and endorsed "per Steam Ship from New York", postmarked with an incomplete red "Philadelphia, Pa./Paid" c.d.s. and a matching "PAID/10", docketed 1857, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $75


In 1856
Wabash was flagship of Commodore Paulding's Home Squadron. In 1858 she became flagship of Commodore La Vallette's Mediterranean Squadron and, at the outbreak of the Civil War, served as flagship of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron under Rear Admiral Silas H. Stringham. She took part in the capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark. On October 29, 1861, she was designated flagship of the Union Navy's South Atlantic Blockading Squadron and sailed south to spearhead the assault on Port Royal, which became the Squadron's new headquarters.
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