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Sale 5127

The "Patrick" Collection
of Naval Militaria, History & Related


Naval Leaders: Autographs, Cartes de Visite, etc.




Lot Photo Description
Lot 3193
Bailey, Admiral Theodorus (1818-1867), photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by McAllister & Brother of Philadelphia, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $100


Bailey commanded the
Lexington in the Mexican War. In the Civil War he commanded the East Gulf Blockading Squadron until stricken with Yellow Fever. In 1864 he became commandant of the Portsmouth Navy Yard .
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Lot 3194
Breese, Admiral Samuel Livingston (1794-1870), Autograph Letter Signed, "U. S. Ship Cumberland, Boston 24 Sept. 1843", 8" x 10", letter to Secretary of the Navy, David Henshaw recommending a Mr. A.B. Campbell of Philadelphia, "If the Department has not already designated a Professor of Mathematics for this ship." Also includes a photographic Carte de Visite of Breese ca. 1870s by E. & H. T. Anthony of New York from a Mathew Brady negative; tear in clear upper left corner; bottom edge of Carte de Visite trimmed slightly, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $200


Breese was commissioned in 1816, serving in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. He was, for a short time, Military Governor of Tuxpan during the Mexican War. In the 1850s he commanded the Norfolk Navy Yard, followed by the Mediterranean Squadron and, finally, the Brooklyn Navy Yard. In July 1862 he was given the rank of Commodore and placed on the retired list and in September of that same year, was one of the first group of 13 Commodores promoted to Rear Admiral when that rank was introduced into the Navy. He was appointed Lighthouse Inspector in the same year and became Port Admiral of Philadelphia in 1869.

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Lot 3195
Crowninshield, Benjamin W. (1772-1851), Secretary of the Navy, 1816-18, 1817 folded letter to Secretary Crowninshield in Salem Mass., postmarked with a brown Aug 8 WASHn. City c.d.s. and a matching "FREE"; datelined Navy Department and written and signed by Chief Clerk of the Navy, Benjamin Homans, regarding a commission for Midshipman James Nicholson, son of the late Commodore of the same name; Crowninshield has written a short paragraph - his response in the affirmative - on the reverse and signed it "B W Crowninshield".
Suggested Bid $150


Benjamin Homans is credited with saving many of the Navy's early records from fire as the British burned Washington. The request in this letter is interesting in that Nicholson claims that a different Midshipman of the same name had, a year earlier, received the commission that was intended for him.

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Lot 3196
Davis, Admiral Charles Henry (1807-1877), signature "C. H. Davis" on a partly-printed Transfer Order headed "South Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag Ship Guerriere (1st Rate)" and dated Rio de Janeiro, Sept. 23, 1868; the order detaches Midshipman J.T. Sullivan from the U.S.S. Quinnebaug and orders him to report to Capt. T. G. Corbin aboard the Guerriere; Corbin has written and signed "Reported Sept 26th 1868, Thos. G Corbin, Captain U S Navy"; the reverse is docketed and signed by Commodore Edward Barrett, "Delivered 23 Sept 1868 (signed) E. Barrett, Commander", F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $200
.
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Lot 3197
DuPont, Admiral Samuel Francis (1803-1865), Autograph Letter Signed, "Near Wilmington Del, July 28th 1860", 8" x 10"; two-sided letter to Secretary of the Navy Isaac Toucey giving a detailed account of the desertion of one William Canning, who deserted DuPont's ship, U.S.S. Minnesota, "while lying at Mew Bay Straits of Sunda" [Indonesia] in October 1857 (Canning was soon apprehended in Batavia); signed "S. F. DuPont, Capt USN"; light paper-clip rust stains at the top, slight edge damage on one edge where it was removed from the address leaf, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $150


DuPont was a member of the prominent DuPont family of Delaware. In the MexicanAmerican War, he captured San Diego, and was made commander of the California Naval Blockade. Through the 1850s he promoted engineering studies at the U. S. Naval Academy, and, in 1860, was made Commandant of the Philadelphia Navy Yard, expecting to retire there. However, the outbreak of the Civil War forced him back to active duty, where he played a major role in making the Union blockade effective. Later he was controversially blamed for the failed attack on Fort Sumter in April 1863, despite the fact that he had predicted it would fail, and he was relieved of his Command.

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Lot 3198
Farragut, Admiral David Glasgow (1801-1870), photographic Carte de Visite, 1862 by E. Anthony of New York, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $150


Farragut was the adopted son of Commodore David Porter and step-brother to Admiral David Dixon Porter and Commodore William David Porter. He commanded
Ferret, Saratoga and Brooklyn, as well as the Mare Island Navy Yard before heading the West Gulf Blockading Squadron and taking New Orleans and Mobile Bay. He was the Navy's first Vice-Admiral, and its first full (Four-Star) Admiral.
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Lot 3199

Faxon, William, Chief Clerk of the Navy (1861-66), manuscript frank, "Wm Paxon" on a legal size Navy Department Official Business envelope postmarked with a Washington D.C./Free c.d.s., Jun 2, 1864, to a Commander E. M. Yard at Trenton, N.J.; minor edge flaws, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $75


Faxon was a journalist in Hartford, Ct., before joining the Navy. From 1866-69 he served as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy
.
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Lot 3200
Foote, Admiral Andrew Hull (1806-1863), Autograph Letter Signed datelined "New Haven, July 17/62", 5" x 8"; the letter, to Dr. Charles Cullis in Boston, reads, "Agreeably to your request I send you a few words in M.S. [?] but a large correspondence and not having recovered from the effects of my wound at Fort Donelson compels me to be brief", signed "A H Foote, Flag Officer, U.S.N."; also includes a photographic Carte de Visite of Foote by Charles D. Fredricks & Co. of New York; letter with small tear at upper right, bottom corners of card rounded, F.-V.F. A rare Foote Civil War letter mentioning the wound received at Fort Donelson., .
Suggested Bid $300


In February 1862, then-Captain Foote and General Grant launched an operation against Forts Henry and Donelson. Foote's fire on Fort Henry was so effective that it surrendered before Grant even moved his Army into position. Fort Donelson, however, was more difficult and Foote was wounded during the attack. After recovering, later in 1862, Foote was promoted to Rear Admiral and given command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron but died suddenly en route to his assignment.

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Lot 3201
Goldsborough, Admiral Louis Malesherbes (1805-1877), Autograph Letter Signed as Captain of the "U. S. Frigate 'Congress', Rio Janeiro, November 29th 1859", 8" x 12½"; an order to have the ship's "dingy" thoroughly inspected as per a suggestion made by the ship's carpenter earlier that same day and written on the other side of the same order; addressed to the two Lieutenants and the Master of the Congress and signed "L. M. Goldsborough, Captain"; also includes an unattributed Carte de Visite photo of Goldsborough, ca. mid-1860s; the letter has a horizontal tear at the left edge affecting the name of one of the Lieutenants and the signature of the carpenter, "C. Jordan," on the reverse, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $200


Goldsborough began his Naval career at the age of 11 when he became a Midshipman at the U.S. Navy Academy. During his career he served as Superintendent of that same Naval Academy (185357) and commander of the Brazil Squadron (185961), the Atlantic Blockading Squadron (1861), the newly formed North Atlantic Blockading Squadron (1861-65), the newly formed European Squadron (1865-68), and the Washington Navy Yard (1868-73).

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Lot 3202

Lee, Admiral Samuel Phillips (1812-1897), cover addressed to "Actg Rear Admiral S. Phillips Lee, Comg USN A Blockg Squadron, Hampton Roads, Old Pt. Comfort PO, Va.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Washington D.C. c.d.s., Oct 8, 1863; top flap missing, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $75


Samuel Phillips Lee was the grandson of Richard Henry Lee (signer of the Declaration of Independence), brother-in-law of Montgomery Blair (Lincoln's Postmaster General), and third cousin of Robert E. Lee. He commanded the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 1862 until October 1864.

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Lot 3203
Morris, Commander George Upham (1830-1875), photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by E. Anthony of New York from a Mathew Brady negative, bottom edge trimmed slightly, otherwise Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $150


As a Lieutenant, Morris commanded the badly outclassed
Cumberland in her heroically-fought losing battle with the C.S.S. Virginia at the Battle of Hampton Roads.
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Lot 3204
Paulding, Admiral Hiram (1797-1878), Document Signed as Commandant of the New York Navy Yard, Feb 15, 1864; an orders jacket forwarded and signed "H. Paulding"; includes photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by E. Anthony of New York from a Mathew Brady negative. The document also includes the endorsement, "Reported May 11th 1864, off Charleston S.C., [signed] J A Dahlgren, Rear Admiral, S A B Squadron", and is handstamped as received by the Treasury Department on Sep 15, 1884, Very Fine. A rare Civil War document signed by two Admirals, .
Suggested Bid $300


Paulding began his career in 1811 and served admirably in several theaters of operation. However, when his Home Squadron captured American mercenary, William Walker, who was attempting to unite several Central American countries as English-speaking colonies under his rule, it created a controversy over the legality of seizing American nationals in neutral foreign lands. As a result, Paulding was forced into retirement. At the outbreak of the Civil War, President Lincoln recalled Paulding to help build the Union fleet and he served as Commandant of the New York Navy Yard for the duration of the war.

John Adolphus Bernard Dahlgren (1809-1870) founded the Navy's Ordnance Department and oversaw major advances in gunnery, including a cast-iron muzzle-loading cannon with greatly increased range and accuracy, known as the Dahlgren gun, that became the Navy's standard armament. In the Civil War he served as Commander of the Washington Navy Yard, establishing the Bureau of Ordnance. In 1863, he took command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron at the rank of Rear Admiral, and helped General William Tecumseh Sherman secure Savannah, Georgia.

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Lot 3205
Porter, Admiral David Dixon (1813-1891), Autograph Letter Signed as full Admiral "David D Porter, Admiral", Washington D.C., March 6, 1882, 5" x 8"; letter concerns an unidentified "valuable war document" the addressee, one J.L. Ambrose of New York, was supposed to have sent to Dixon, but had not yet been received, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $200
.
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Lot 3206
Porter, Commodore David (1780-1843), a hand-carried folded two-page letter datelined "On board Gun Vessel No. 12, Rigolets, March 16, 1809", to Samuel Hambleton, Purser of the Navy, in New Orleans, advising him of events transpiring in the area involving ongoing disputes with the Spanish government in "West Florida" over American produce; signed boldly "D Porter"; slight moth damage affecting signature, otherwise Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Porter was the father of Five-Star Admiral David Dixon Porter. He attained the rank of captain and the honorary title of commodore, commanding a number ships, including the famous U.S.S.
Constitution. He saw service in the First Barbary War, the War of 1812 and in the West Indies. Upon his return to the U.S., Porter was court-martialed for the unsanctioned act of invading the town of Fajardo, Puerto Rico (a Spanish colony) to avenge the jailing of an officer from his fleet. Shortly afterward he resigned his commission and entered the Mexican Navy as its Commander-in-Chief.
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Lot 3207
Porter, Commodore William David, "Dirty Bill" (1818-1864), photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by Charles D. Fredricks & Co. of New York, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $150


Porter was the son of Commodore David Porter, the older half-brother of Admiral David Dixon Porter and foster brother of Admiral David G. Farragut. He aided in the construction of the Mississippi River Flotilla. He actually oversaw the repair of his ship, the
Essex ,and the construcion of two new Ironclads from his sick bed while recovering from wounds sustained when the boiler of Essex exploded during the February 1862 attack on Fort Henry. He earned the nickname "Dirty Bill" from his colorful use of the English language.
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Lot 3208
Porter, Lt. Benjamin H. (1845-1865), photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by E. & H.T. Anthony & Co. from a Mathew Brady negative; marked in pencil below photo "Lieut. Porter", Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $150


The 20-year-old Porter commanded Admiral David Porter's (no relation) flagship,
Malvern and carried Porter's flag, leading his fellow crewman in the land assault on Fort Fisher in January 1865. He was fatally shot in the action.

In Skaneateles, N.Y., on May 28, 1882, the Benjamin H. Porter Post of the Grand Army of the Republic was chartered in his memory and his life-size figure stands in the Onondaga County War Memorial.

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Lot 3209
Rodgers, Admiral Admiral John (1812-1882), Autograph Letter Signed datelined "Navy Yard, Aug 25" [late 1860s], 5" x 8"; the letter is an invitation to "Maj Genl J. B. Foster" [probably John G. Foster], in part, "Genl Sherman, Secretary of the Navy [probably Gideon Welles] & Vice Adl. Porter will come to my house tomorrow at 12. Meredith, my wife & I shall be very glad if you and your ladies will grace us with your company", signed "Yours very truly, John Rodgers"; also includes a photographic Carte de Visite of Rodgers by E. Anthony of New York, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $250


Rodgers, son of War of 1812 hero, Commodore John Rodgers, rose from Commander to Captain to Commodore during the Civil War, organizing and commanding Gunboat Squadrons. After the War he commanded the Boston Navy Yard until 1869 when he was promoted to Rear Admiral and given command of the Asiatic Squadron and later, the United States expedition to Korea.

Until 1869, when he was promoted to Rear Admiral and given command of the Asiatic Squadron and the.
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Lot 3210
Rodgers, John (1772-1838), Acting Secretary of the Navy, 1823, 1835 manuscript frank on a folded letter as president of the Navy Board of Commissioners endorsed "Jn Rodgers" with a red Feb 10 City of Washington c.d.s. and matching handstamped "FREE", the letter, datelined "Nav Comm Off, 9th Feby 1835" is to Daniel D. Brodhead, Navy Agent, Boston, and is also signed by Rodgers, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $100


Rodgers served two terms as President of the Board of Navy Commissioners and, for a time in 1823, served as Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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Lot 3211
Rodgers, John (1772-1838), Acting Secretary of the Navy, 1823, ca 1830 folded address leaf from the Boston Navy Commissioner's Office endorsed "Jn Rodgers" with a red Sep 29 Boston c.d.s. and matching handstamped "FREE", to Commodore James Barron in Philadelphia; front and back rejoined, otherwise Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $50


Rodgers served two terms as President of the Board of Navy Commissioners and, for a time in 1823, served as Acting Secretary of the Navy. The addressee, James Barron, was a controversial figure who, in March 1820, challenged Revolutionary War hero Commodore Stephen Decatur to a duel; both men were shot, Decatur dying from his wound.

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Lot 3212
Shubrick, Admiral William Branford (1790-1874), Autograph Letter Signed as head of the "Bureau of Construction &c., March 24th 1853", 8" x 10"; a glowing letter of recommendation for one John W. Branaugh signed "W B Shubrick"; also includes a Carte de Visite photo of Shubrick ca. mid-1860s (removed cleanly from card), Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $150


William Shubrick served in the Navy for 55 years, begining in 1806 and ending with mandatory retirement 1n 1861. He earned the Congressional Medal in the War of 1812, played an important role in the Mexican-American War, and headed the Philadelphia Navy Yard and the Bureau of Construction and Repair. He was awarded the rank of Rear Admiral on the retired list in 1862.

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Lot 3213
Southard, Samuel L. (1787-1842), Secretary of the Navy, 1823-29, folded address leaf endorsed "Free Samuel Southard" with a red New York c.d.s., Aug 15 (1837), addressed in Southard's hand to Virgil Maxcy in Newport, R.I., Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $150


Virgil Maxcy was a Maryland politician who, in early February 1844, was considered by President John Tyler for Secretary of the Navy, Tyler appointing Thomas Walker Gilmer instead. Later that same month, both Maxcy and Gilmer, while on a demonstration cruise aboard the steamer U.S.S.
Princeton, were among six people killed when a cannon, nicknamed the Peacemaker exploded, spraying shrapnel into the crowd.
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Lot 3214
Stoddert, Benjamin (1744-1813), First Secretary of the Navy, 1798-1801, folded address leaf endorsed "Navy Dept., Ben Stoddert" with a purple "PHI/22/AU" c.d.s. and a matching "FREE", addressed in Stoddert's hand to General Samuel Smith in Baltimore; some edge toning and back tears, otherwise Very Fine. The Philadelphia markings are very rare in purple., .
Suggested Bid $100
.
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Lot 3215
The Trent Affair - Captain Charles Wilkes, Autograph Letter Signed, dated Philadelphia, Feb 9, 1845, 8"x10"; letter to Secretary of the Navy, John Y. Mason, recommending a promotion for one Samuel Williams, who had served as a Gunner's Mate on the U.S.S. Vincennes during the United States Exploring Expedition of 18381842, often referred to as the "Wilkes Expedition", as it was led by then-Lieutenant Wilkes and the Vincennes, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $200


The United States Exploring Expedition explored and surveyed the Pacific Ocean and its surrounding lands. It proved to be of major importance to the growth of science in the United States, particularly the nascent field of oceanography. Armed conflict between Pacific islanders and the expedition was common and dozens of natives were killed, as well as a few Americans.

Upon his return, having logged some 87,000 miles and lost two ships and 28 men, Wilkes was court-martialed for the loss of one of the ships, for the regular mistreatment of his subordinate officers, and for excessive punishment of his sailors. He was acquitted on all charges except that of illegally punishing his crewmen.

After the
Trent Affair, and another incident in Bermuda, he became known as "Notorious Wilkes". Due to a running dispute with Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, he was again court-martialed in 1864 and found guilty of, among other charges, insubordination and disobeying orders. He received a public reprimand and a three-year suspension, which President Lincoln reduced to one year. In July 1866 he was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral (Retired).
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Lot 3216
The Trent Affair - James Murray Mason and John Slidell, two photographic Cartes de Visite ca. 1870s by E. Anderson & Co. of New York from a Mathew Brady negative, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $200


The Trent Affair was a diplomatic incident that occurred in November 1861 and threatened a war between the United States and the United Kingdom. The U.S.S. San Jacinto, commanded by Captain Charles Wilkes intercepted the British mail packet R.M.S. Trent and illegally took into custody two Confederate diplomats that were aboard, James Murray Mason and John Slidell. Wilkes considered the two, who had been bound for Britain and France to press the Confederacy's case for diplomatic recognition and to lobby for possible financial and military support, to be contraband of war.

In the U.S., the public celebrated the capture and rallied against Britain, threatening war. In the Confederacy, the hope was that the incident would lead to a break in Anglo-American relations, possibly even war, or at least to diplomatic recognition by Britain. The British public disapproved of this violation of their neutral rights and insult to their national honor, while the British government demanded an apology and the release of the prisoners, taking steps to strengthen British military forces in Canada and the Atlantic.

President Lincoln and his advisors did not want to risk war with Britain and, after several tense weeks, the Lincoln administration disavowed Captain Wilkes's actions and released Mason and Slidell, who resumed their voyage to Britain but failed in achieving diplomatic recognition. No official apology was ever made.

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Lot 3217
The Trent Affair - Donald MacNeil Fairfax, photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by Silsbee, Case & Co. of Boston, F.-V.F. Fairfax was the Executive Officer of the Vincennes who boarded the Trent to take Confederate commissioners James M. Mason and John Slidell into custody., .
Suggested Bid $200


The Trent Affair was a diplomatic incident that occurred in November 1861 and threatened a war between the United States and the United Kingdom. The U.S.S. San Jacinto, commanded by Captain Charles Wilkes intercepted the British mail packet R.M.S. Trent and illegally took into custody two Confederate diplomats that were aboard, James Murray Mason and John Slidell. Wilkes considered the two, who had been bound for Britain and France to press the Confederacy's case for diplomatic recognition and to lobby for possible financial and military support, to be contraband of war.

In the U.S., the public celebrated the capture and rallied against Britain, threatening war. In the Confederacy, the hope was that the incident would lead to a break in Anglo-American relations, possibly even war, or at least to diplomatic recognition by Britain. The British public disapproved of this violation of their neutral rights and insult to their national honor, while the British government demanded an apology and the release of the prisoners, taking steps to strengthen British military forces in Canada and the Atlantic.

President Lincoln and his advisors did not want to risk war with Britain and, after several tense weeks, the Lincoln administration disavowed Captain Wilkes's actions and released Mason and Slidell, who resumed their voyage to Britain but failed in achieving diplomatic recognition. No official apology was ever made.

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Lot 3218
Walker, Admiral John Grimes (1835-1907), Document Signed as Chief of the Bureau of Navigation & Office of Detail on that bureau's Navy Department letterhead, Sep 8, 1884, 8" x 10"; a request for settlement of accounts to Paymaster W.W. Woodhull after his detachment from the U.S.S. Lackawanna; boldly signed "J.G. Walker"; also includes a gilt-edged cabinet card photo of Walker ca 1880 by C. M. Bell of Washington D.C.; the photo is marked "Proof" and, on the reverse,"Nicaragua Canal Book", indicating that it may have been used in the 1900 book, The Nicaragua Canal by William Simmons, published in 1900 by Harper & Brothers; document with light mounting stains at the corners, F.-V.F.
Suggested Bid $150


Walker joined the Navy in 1850. He earned an appointment to the Naval Academy in 1851 and graduated head of his class in 1855. In the Civil War he commanded the Ironclad Steamer
Baron Du Kalb in the Mississippi River Flotilla. After the war he commanded Shawmut and Sabine . He later served in many capacities, retiring as a Full (Four-Star) Admiral in 1897, at which time he was chosen to serve as President of the Nicaragua Canal Commission and, in 1899, President of the Isthmian Canal Commission.
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Lot 3219
Welles, Gideon (1802-1878), Secretary of the Navy, 1861-69, Document Signed as Secretary of the Navy, on Navy Department letterhead, Jan 15, 1864, 8" x 10"; a three-day leave of absence for Midshipman Jonathan Sullivan of Newport, R.I.; signed "Gideon Welles"; bit of light foxing, minor mounting remnants on reverse, Fine.
Suggested Bid $150
.
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Lot 3220

Welles, Gideon (1802-1878), Secretary of the Navy, 1861-69, 1817 folded letter to Secretary Welles from 17-year-old Nicholas Krogsgaard, a Norwegian living in to the U.S. for ten years, requesting admission to the Naval Academy; franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked New York, Nov 24, 1862; Internal notation in Welles' hand, "Nicholas E. Krogsgaard, Mid. N.Y., about 17, Nov 63. Norwegian & 10 years in the country. Self. Regt- Nov 27. 1863 -"; bit of internal splitting.
Suggested Bid $70
.
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Lot 3221
Winslow, Admiral John Ancrum (1811-1873), photographic Carte de Visite ca. 1870s by J. W. Black of Boston, Very Fine.
Suggested Bid $150


Winslow's first command was in the Mexican War. During the Civil War he was in command of the steam sloop of war U.S.S.
Kearsarge during her historic 1864 action off Cherbourg, France, with the Confederate sea raider C.S.S. Alabama.
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