Printable Version

Sale 746

The "Patrick" Collection
of Naval Militaria, History & Related


Naval Ship Covers




Lot Photo Description
Lot 30

U.S.S. Acacia, Steam Tugboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Acacia', Off Charleston S.C., 2-28-'65"ten days after the surrender of Charleston—franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a straightline "U.S. SHIP" with a Philadelphia, Mar 7, 1865 c.d.s. and a handstamped "Due 6", to Terryville, Conn.; edge flaws, Fine. The letter must have been over half an ounce, shortpaid by 3¢, and charged double.
Estimate $200 - 300

Acacia was launched as the Vicksburg in September of 1863, then purchased by the Navy and commissioned as U.S.S. Acacia on Oct 28 of the same year and served as part of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Her greatest success was the capture of the Julia, an iron-hulled blockade-runner that had grounded and been abandoned off Cape Romain, South Carolina.
Realized $375.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 31

U.S.S. Acacia, Steam Tugboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Acacia', Off Charleston S.C., 11-4-'64" and franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a four-point star-in-circle with a Nov 9 New York c.d.s. alongside, to Bristol, Conn.; edge flaws, Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Acacia was launched as the Vicksburg in September of 1863, then purchased by the Navy and commissioned as U.S.S. Acacia on Oct 28 of the same year and served as part of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Her greatest success was the capture of the Julia, an iron-hulled blockade-runner that had grounded and been abandoned off Cape Romain, South Carolina.
Realized $250.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 32

U.S.S. Adirondack, Screw Sloop, cover addressed to "Lieut. James Packer, U.S. Steamer 'Adirondack', Old Point Comfort, Virginia.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Newark, N.J. c.d.s., Aug 10, 1863; reduced slightly at the left, Very Fine. An exceedingly rare cover, Adirondack being in service for less than two months from her Commissioning on June 30, to her loss on August 23.
Estimate $300 - 400

Adirondack was commissioned in 1862 with a complement of 160. She was assigned to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron but was diverted to investigate a British-built vessel being fitted as a CSN cruiser in the Bahamas. After verifying the information she was ordered to Port Royal but on learning that the CSS Alabama had departed for the Bahamas, Welles ordered her back to the Bahamas where she struck a reef and was lost after only two months of service.
Realized $225.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 33

U.S.S. Albatross, Screw Gunboat, Admiral David G. Farragut endorsement on a folded letter, forwarded by mail pouch; from the Captain of the U.S.S. Albatross to Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, recommending Masters Mate William Harcourt for promotion to Acting Gunner; datelined "U S Steamer Albatross, Pensacola Bay, Nov 4th 1862", endorsed on the outside "Respectfully forwarded with enclosures [signed] 'D.G. Farragut', Rear Admiral Comdg WGBlg Squad"; the letter is signed by three of the ship's officers, including Executive Officer Theodore B. DuBois, who would take over command of Albatross when her captain, John E. Hart, died of yellow fever in June 1863, Very Fine.
Estimate $500 - 750

Albatross, built in 1858 as a screw steamer was acquired by the Navy in 1861 and outfitted as a gunboat. She was briefly assigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron before being transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron for the remainder of the war. She participated in lower Mississippi operations then served on blockade duty.
Realized $425.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 34

U.S.S. Atlanta, Casement Ironclad, cover franked with a 3¢ rose (65) (damaged pre-use) tied by a circle-of-Vs alongside a Norwich, Con., Jul 26, 1864 postmark; addressed to "Henry A. Phelan, Executive Officer, U. S. Iron Clad Atlanta, Norfolk, Va."; opened somewhat roughly at the right, Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Atlanta was converted by the Confederate Navy from a British blockade-runner, Fingal. Operating out of Charleston, she was captured by two Union ironclads when she ran aground during an unsuccessful attack on Port Royal. She was refitted and assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, where she served on the James River protecting against Confederate ironclads.
Realized $90.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 35

U.S.S. Azalea, Steam Tugboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "From U.S.S. Str. Azalia"[sic], franked with a target-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a straightline "U. S. SHIP" and an Aug 26 Philadelphia c.d.s., to Wenham, Mass., docketed "Aug. 29th 1864".
Estimate $150 - 200

Azalea was purchased and armed in 1864 and served in the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. On July 8, 1864, along with the Sweet Brier, she captured the schooner Pocahontas with a cargo of cotton and tobacco. She received a 50 percent share of the prize money. She was sold out of the service in 1865 at the end of the war.
Realized $250.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 36

U.S.S. Bainbridge, Brig, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S. Brig 'Bainbridge', Aspinwall N.G.", franked with a 10¢ green (68) tied by a clear "N. YORK/ STEAMSHIP" circle with a handstamped "Due 10" rate, to Charles Rogers, Boston, Mass. - letter no. 58 in the Rogers Correspondence; stamp missing perforations at the right, otherwise Very Fine. This cover dates between September 1862 and May 1863, while Bainbridge was on station at Aspinwall.
Estimate $350 - 500

Bainbridge was assigned to the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. She was sent to Aspinwall where she was severely damaged by a storm. After refitting, she was on her way to join the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron when she was caught in another storm, this one off Cape Hatteras, and sank with only one survivor.
Realized $325.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 37

U.S.S. Bainbridge, Brig, cover with manuscript endorsement "US Brig 'Bainbridge', Aspinwall N.G.", franked with a 10¢ green (68) tied by a "N. YORK/ STEAMSHIP" circle (upside down) with a handstamped "Due 10" ("10" faint), to Boston; reduced a bit at the left, Fine to Very Fine. This cover dates between September 1862 and May 1863, while Bainbridge was on station at Aspinwall.
Estimate $300 - 400

Bainbridge was assigned to the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. She was sent to Aspinwall where she was severely damaged by a storm. After refitting, she was on her way to join the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron when she was caught in another storm, this one off of Cape Hatteras, and sank with only one survivor.
Realized $325.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 38

U.S.S. Bainbridge, Brig, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S. Brig 'Bainbridge', Aspinwall New Granada, Sep 14th 1861" and "Per Str 'North Star' Via N.Y.", handstamped straightline "STEAM/ SHIP" and "40" (double rate - 2,500 miles, Aspinwall to Boston), to Charles Rogers, Newton, Mass. - letter no. 9 in the Rogers Correspondence; minor edge wear, Fine. This cover dates between September 1862 and May 1863, while Bainbridge was on station at Aspinwall.
Estimate $250 - 350

Bainbridge was assigned to the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. She was sent to Aspinwall where she was severely damaged by a storm. After refitting, she was on her way to join the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron when she was caught in another storm, this one off Cape Hatteras, and sank with only one survivor.
Realized $450.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 39

U.S.S. Benton, Ironclad River Gunboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "On board U. S. gun boat 'Benton'" franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a clear Newark, N.J. c.d.s., Dec 19, 1862; to Cairo, Ill., Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $250 - 350

Originally a center-wheel catamaran salvage "snagboat",
Submarine No. 7, she was converted to an ironclad Gunboat and commissioned as U.S.S. Benton in February 1862, joining Admiral Andrew Foote's Mississippi River Command.
Realized $160.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 40

U.S.S. Bienville, Side-Wheel Steamer, folded letter with manuscript endorsement "pr 'Bienville'" and datelined "Havana, 17 February 1861", to Boston with a bold, mostly complete New York "STEAMSHIP/10" circle. This cover was mailed prior to the War when Bienville was still a private commercial steamer.
Estimate $150 - 200

Bienville, with a complement of 162, was purchased by the navy in August 1861 and converted to a blockade vessel. She was with the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron taking Port Royal, and position in Georgia and Florida before being transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
Realized $72.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 41

U.S.S. Brandywine, Frigate, cover addressed to "Paymaster Thos. H. Looker U.S.N., U.S. Frigate 'Brandywine', Off Fortress Monroe, Old Point, Va." franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a target cancel and a Nov 8 New York c.d.s.; includes the original three-page letter from Looker's wife, datelined Hoboken, N.J., Nov 7; somewhat roughly opened at the top, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $300 - 400

Originally built in 1825 as the 44-gun frigate
Susquehanna , her first task was to transport the Marquis de Lafayette back to France. She was renamed Brandywine in honor of the battle in which Lafayette was wounded while fighting with American forces. She was later recommissioned a number of times for service in various theaters, finally in October 1861, when she joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, most of the time stationed off of Fortress Monroe.
Realized $129.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 42

U.S.S. Brooklyn, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. Brooklyn, Pensacola Bay, Apr. 21st 63" franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a fancy circle-of-wedges with a May 5 New York c.d.s. alongside; to Salem, N.J. and including the original, easily read three-page letter which mentions "instructions for the collection of Magnolia prize money." [Magnolia was a southern steamer captured by Brooklyn while attempting to slip through the blockade with 1,200 bales of cotton] and "I do not think another attack will be made on Fort Hudson until land forces are ready.", Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Brooklyn was commissioned in January 1859 with then-Captain David Farragut in command. She participated at New Orleans, the lower Mississippi and Mobile Bay, before joining the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
Realized $450.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 43

U.S.S. Brooklyn, Steam Sloop, 3¢ pink entire (U58) addressed to "Rezeau B. Pott Esqr., Third Asst. Engineer U.S.S. Richmond, Post Office New Orleans, Louisiana", canceled Williamsport, Pa., Dec 22, 1862; slight edge wear, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Brooklyn was commissioned in January 1859 with then-Captain David Farragut in command. She participated at New Orleans, the lower Mississippi and Mobile Bay, before joining the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
Realized $160.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 44

U.S.S. Calypso, Screw Steamer, cover addressed to "Surgeon of U.S.S. 'Calypso', Hampton Roads, Va.", franked with a 2¢ Boyd's Local (20L18) tied by a company oval and a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a fancy oval with a partial Apr 4 New York c.d.s. alongside; reduced slightly at the right, Boyd's Local oxidized, otherwise Very Fine. An exceedingly rare use of a U.S. Local on a ship's cover.
Estimate $400 - 600

Calypso, an armed steamer, was captured in June 1863 by the U.S.S. Florida, while running the Union blockade off of Wilmington, N.C. She was then purchased from the prize court and commissioned in the Union Navy in October 1863, at which time she joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron patrolling the Bahamas routes to Wilmington and the Chesapeake.
Realized $425.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 45

U.S.S. Cambridge, Screw Steamer, cover addressed to "Acting Master, Robert D. Eldridge, On board U.S. Steamer Cambridge, blockading Squadron, Old Point Comfort", franked with a neatly canceled 3¢ rose (65) with a red "New Bedford Mass./Paid/Dec 10" c.d.s. alongside; slight edge wear and reduced a bit at the top, Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Cambridge served with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from September 1861 until October 1864. In February 1865 she was transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron where she served for the duration of the war.
Realized $72.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 46

U.S.S. Canandaigua, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Canandaigua'" franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Port Royal, S.C. target duplex, Mar, 1864; from Joseph W. Congdon, Canandaigua's Captain, to his wife in Williamsburgh, L.I., N.Y., Very Fine.
Estimate $400 - 600

Canandaigua joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in August 1862. She participated in a long series of attacks on Confederate positions in Charleston, S.C., in 1863 and 1864. On February 17, 1864, she rescued 150 members of the crew of Housatonic when the latter was sunk by the attack of the Confederate submarine C.S.S. H. L. Hunley—the first successful submarine attack in history.
Realized $275.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 47

U.S.S. Canandaigua, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Canandaigua'" franked with three 3¢ rose (65) tied by fancy Sep 5 New York duplexes; from Joseph W. Congdon, Canandaigua's Captain, to his wife in Williamsburgh, L.I., N.Y.; reduced just a tad at the left, right-most stamp slightly damaged, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $400 - 600

Canandaigua joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in August 1862. She participated in a long series of attacks on Confederate positions in Charleston, S.C. in 1863 and 1864. On February 17, 1864, she rescued 150 members of the crew of Housatonic when the latter was sunk by the attack of the Confederate submarine C.S.S. H. L. Hunley—the first successful submarine attack in history.
Realized $200.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 48

U.S.S. Canandaigua, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Canandaigua'" franked with three 3¢ rose (65) tied by Port Royal, S.C. target duplexes, Jul 25, 1864; from Joseph W. Congdon, Canandaigua's Captain, to his wife in Wickford, R.I.; damaged corners (affecting one stamp) and roughly opened at the left, about Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Canandaigua joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in August 1862. She participated in a long series of attacks on Confederate positions in Charleston, S.C. in 1863 and 1864. On February 17, 1864, she rescued 150 members of the crew of Housatonic when the latter was sunk by the attack of the Confederate submarine C.S.S. H. L. Hunley—the first successful submarine attack in history.
Realized $110.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 49

U.S.S. Carondelet, Eads City-Class Gunboat, cover addressed to "Mr. Scott D. Jordan, Acting Ensign, U.S. Steamer. Carondelet, Miss. Squadron, via Cairo, Illinois", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a partial Portland, Me. c.d.s. and at "DUE/6" in arc; reduced slightly at the right, Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Carondelet was one of the seven Eads City-Class ironclad gunboats. She saw action at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Island 10, White River, Memphis, Vicksburg and Red River.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 50

U.S.S. Chippewa, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "Ships letter, Jno. W. Philip, U.S.S. 'Chippewa'", sent unfranked and handstamped with a straightline "U.S. SHIP", "Due 6" and a mostly clear Philadelphia c.d.s., Jun 8, 1862, to Warren, Conn., Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $350 - 500

Chippewa served in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from December 1861 until ordered to search for the Confederate raider, C.S.S. Florida, which took her across the Atlantic to Spain and North Africa and to various ports in the West Indies. Upon her return from this unsuccessful cruise, in May 1863, she was reassigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron and operated off the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina. The Florida was finally caught in the port of Bahia, Brazil on October 3, 1864.
Realized $425.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 51

U.S.S. Colorado, Screw Frigate, cover addressed to "Fleet Surgeon Dr. G.R.B. Horner, U.S.S. Colorado, Boston, Mass.", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ dull red (26) and postmarked with a clear Philadelphia octagonal datestamp, Jun 7, 1861—just three days after the Colorado was commissioned and 11 days before she sailed from Boston on her first assignment; upper left corner slightly nicked, otherwise Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Colorado joined the Gulf Blockading Squadron in June 1861 taking blockade-runners and conducting raids. She was reassigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron in October 1864 and participated in the bombardment and capture of Fort Fisher at the mouth of the Cape Fear River, Wilmington, N.C., in January 1865.
Realized $90.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 52

U.S.S. Commodore Hull, Side-Wheel Gunboat, red & blue Flag patriotic cover (Weiss F-R-151 endorsed simply "Ship Letter", initially postmarked "5" in circle (due 3¢ + 2¢ ship fee), but nullified with a red grid and re-rated with an incomplete oval "U.S. (SHIP)/3 cts." (Milgram SH-13); the letter is from George Van Duzen, Acting Master of the Commodore Hull, to his wife Selah in New York; it has been somewhat refreshed and has two sealed opening tears at the top, Fine to Very Fine appearance.
Estimate $250 - 350

Commodore Hull was a side-wheel ferryboat, built as Nuestra Señora del Regla, intended for Havana, Cuba. Purchased in 1862, she was converted to a gunboat and assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She served in the Carolina sounds and was at the siege of Plymouth, NC.
Realized $325.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 53

U.S.S. Commodore Perry, Side-Wheel Gunboat, clean lady's envelope addressed to "H. Augustus Phelan Executive Officer, U.S. Steamer Commodore Perry, Plymouth, N.C., Via Roanoke Isalnd", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a circle-of-wedges with a clear New York c.d.s., Feb 23, 1863, alongside, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Commodore Perry was a sidewheel ferryboat acquired by the Navy and refitted as a gunboat. She was commissioned in October 1861 and in January 1862 joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, where she took part, only a month later, in the capture of Roanoke Island. In October 1862 she participated in the failed Army-Navy attack on Franklin, Va. During the battle four of her crewmen were awarded the Medal of Honor.
Realized $225.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 54

U.S.S. Congress, Frigate, cover with manuscript endorsement "U S Frigate Congress, Newport News," franked with a 3¢ pink (64) tied by a partial Old Point Comfort, Va. c.d.s. (docketed Oct 23, 1861), to East Boston, Mass. and backstamped Boston, Oct 26; reduced just a bit at the right, Fine to Very Fine, with a 1995 P.F. certificate as a "pink".
Estimate $400 - 600

Congress was originally commissioned in May 1842, serving in the Mediterranean and South Atlantic. In September 1861 she joined the Atlantic Blockading Squadron. In March 1862, while part of the Union blockade of Newport News, Va., she fell under attack by the Confederate ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (formerly the U.S.S. Merrimack) and ultimately ran aground and sank with the loss of 120 men.
Realized $375.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 55

U.S.S. Connecticut, Side-Wheel Steamer, stenciled "Ship Connecticut/ A. B. Langworthy" (Milgram No. 282) on the back of a Flag & Canon patriotic cover with the legend "Our Compromise" (Weiss F-R 419), franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a clear Feb 25 New York target duplex (docketed 1861); to Connecticut's Captain, A. B. Langworthy, Milwaukee, Wis., "Sheriff's Office" reduced slightly at the right, otherwise exceptionally clean and Very Fine.
Estimate $1,200 - 1,800

A.B. Langworthy was an Acting Maser's Mate on Connecticut. The addressee, his brother, was a Captain in the 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery.

Built in New York as the
Mississippi, this side-wheel staemer was purchased by the Navy, converted to a warship and commissioned U.S.S. Connecticut in August 1861. Her first voyage was on August 25, 1861, where she delivered men and supplies to blockade ships along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts as far as Galveston, Texas. She later spent time assisting in the search for the Confederate cruiser C.S.S. Nashville, then returned to cargo duty, making five voyages similar to her first. She also captured four schooners with valuable cargo during this period.
Realized $1,500.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 56

U.S.S. Constellation, Frigate, "Stand By The Flag" patriotic cover (Weiss F-R 321) addressed to "Mr. Joseph F. Littlefield, U. S. Ship Constellation, Spezia, Italy, franked with pen-canceled pair of 3¢ rose and a strip of three 12¢ black (65, 69); postmarked Milford, N.H., May 24, 1862 with red crayon "36" rate, red French boxed "P.D." and Jun 10 entry c.d.s., redirected from Spezia to Genoa where it was backstamped on Jun 12; includes the original four-page letter regarding family matters; cover reduced ever so slightly at the left (letter also slightly reduced on one edge), Very Fine. An exceptional example of a Patriotic ship's cover to Europe.
Estimate $1,200 - 1,800

Constellation, the last sail-only warship designed and built by the U.S. Navy, was commissioned in July 1855. She spent most of the war in the Mediterranean gathering intelligence on Confederate raiders and activities.
Realized $1,700.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 57

U.S.S. Constitution, Frigate, cover addressed to "Midshipman Frederic G. Hyde, U.S.S. Constitution, Newport, Rhode Island", franked with a cork-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked Norwichtown, Ct., Jan 15 (1864), Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Constitution, "Old Ironsides", was built in 1797 and is the world's oldest commissioned naval vessel still afloat. In 1857 she was moved to dry dock at the Portsmouth Navy Yard for conversion into a training ship, being refitted with classrooms and reducing her armament to only 16 guns. In August 1860 she was moved to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. Then in April 1861, at the outbreak of the War, after threats were made against her by Southern sympathizers, Constitution, along with the Naval Academy itself, was moved north to Fort Adams in Newport, R.I., for the duration of the war.
Realized $225.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 58

U.S.S. Constitution, Frigate, cover addressed to "Act. Mid. Louis E. Fagan, U.S. Ship Constitution, Annapolis, Md.", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ dull red (26) and postmarked Philadelphia, Feb 16, 1861.
Estimate $150 - 200

Constitution, "Old Ironsides", was built in 1797 and is the world's oldest commissioned naval vessel still afloat. In 1857 she was moved to dry dock at the Portsmouth Navy Yard for conversion into a training ship, being refitted with classrooms and reducing her armament to only 16 guns. In August 1860 she was moved to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. Then in April 1861, at the outbreak of the War, after threats were made against her by Southern sympathizers, Constitution, along with the Naval Academy itself, was moved north to Fort Adams in Newport, R.I., for the duration of the war.
Realized $250.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 59

U.S.S. Cumberland, Frigate, cover with manuscript endorsement "Ship letter, U.S.S. 'Cumberland'", cover franked with a 3¢ dull red (26) tied by an incomplete Old Point Comfort, Va. c.d.s., Sep 11 (1861), to Fort Snelling, Minn.; upper left corner of stamp nicked, Fine to Very Fine. A very scarce Civil War Cumberland ship letter.
Estimate $300 - 400

Cumberland, a sail-only frigate, was launched in November 1842 and served as Flagship for the Pacific, European and Home Squadrons. She was Perry's Flagship during the Mexican-American War. She was rammed and sunk in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (formerly the U.S.S. Merrimack) at Newport News, Va., on March 8, 1862. The engagement, on the first day of the Battle of Hampton Roads, is considered to be a turning point in the history of naval warfare, as it demonstrated the advantage of steam-powered, armored ships over sail-powered, wooden-hulled ships.
Realized $300.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 60

U.S.S. Curlew, Tinclad Stern-Wheel Gunboat, cover with printed endorsement "U.S. Steamer 'Curlew', Miss. Squadron" (Milgram 324), franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Cairo, Ill. target duplex, Apr 30, 1864, to Camden, O.; reduced slightly at the left, otherwise Very Fine. Cairo, at the junction of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, was an important supply base for the Mississippi River Squadron.
Estimate $300 - 400

Curlew, also known as Tinclad No. 12, was launched as the Florence at Pittsburgh in early 1862. She was purchased by the Navy in December 1862 and commissioned as the Curlew in February 1863. She operated as part of the Mississippi River Flotilla on the Mississippi and her tributaries, her eight howitzers making her ideal for bombardment of Confederate positions.
Realized $600.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 61

U.S.S. Currituck, Screw Steamer, cover addressed to "Mr. I. Cohen, Hospital Steward on the U.S.S. Corrituck, [sic] Fort. Monroe, Old Point or Elsewhere", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Washington D.C. c.d.s., May 16, 1862, two months after the epic Monitor - Virginia engagement.
Estimate $150 - 200

Currituck was launched in 1843 as the Seneca. She was purchased by the Navy in September 1861 and commissioned as the Currituck in February 1862. Her first assignment was to tow U.S.S. Monitor to Hampton Roads so that the revolutionary new ironclad could meet the threat of the Confederate ironclad, C.S.S. Virginia (formerly U.S.S. Merrimack) . She spent the remainder of the war as part of the Potomac River Flotilla, convoying transports and hospital boats from Fredericksburg, Va., and also managing to take ten blockade-runners during the same period.
Realized $130.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 62

U.S.S. Essex, Ironclad River Gunboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "Ship Letter, USS Essex, June 28, 63" and handstamped with a partial "U.S. SHIP/ 3cts." in circle and sent to Weymouth Landing, Mass., Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Essex was launched as the New Era in 1856. In 1861 she was acquired by the Army and outfitted as a timberclad gunboat and joined General Foote's Western Gunboat Flotilla, taking part in a Cumberland River expedition. Shortly thereafter she was renamed USS Essex and was refitted with iron armor and various other upgrades. In February 1862 she took part in the attack on Fort Henry, Tennessee. In October 1862 she was transferred from the Army to the Navy and took part in the capture of Fort Hudson and was part of the Red River Campaign.
Realized $170.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 63

U.S.S. Florida, Side-Wheel Steamer, Lady Liberty & George Washington Shield patriotic cover with "The War for the Union" (Weiss FP-GW 129, verse 2386) with manuscript endorsement "U.S. Steamer Florida, Ship Letter" at the upper right, handstamped "U.S. SHIP/3cts." and sent to Philadelphia; reduced slightly at the right, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $400 - 600

Florida was acquired by the Navy in October 1861 and converted to a cruiser. She was assigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron and participated in the operations that took Port Royal and positions in northern Florida and Georgia. She was later assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, where she was successful in the capture or destruction of several blockade-runners.
Realized $275.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 64

U.S.S. Fort Donelson, Side-Wheel Steamer, cover addressed to "Dr. Max G. Raffler(?), S.S. 'Fort Donelson', New Inlet off Fort Fisher, N.C.", franked with a cork-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked Old Point Comfort, Va., Feb 23 (1865); include the original letter datelined "U S S Newbern, Hampton Roads 23 Feby 1865", Fine to Very Fine. A very scarce ship-to-ship letter.
Estimate $150 - 200

Fort Donelson was originally the British merchant steamer Giraffe, launched in May 1860 to serve as a blockade-runner. She was acquired by the Confederate Navy, renamed Robert E. Lee, and made her first voyage in January 1863 and established a near-legendary reputation as a blockade-runner, making 21 successful voyages in ten months. She was finally captured on her 22nd voyage in November 1863. She was then purchased by the Union Navy from a Boston Prize Court and, in June 1864, recommissioned U.S.S. Fort Donelson, joining the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron for the remainder of the war.
Realized $180.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 65

U.S.S. Galena, Ironclad Corvette, cover addressed to "Lieut. James Parker, U.S. Steamer 'Galena', Old Point Comfort, Virginia", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a Newark, N.J. c.d.s., Mar 9, 1863, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Galena was commissioned in April 1862 as one of three ironclads built to combat the C.S.S. Virginia. She joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, but her armor was found to be too thin to prevent Confederate shots from penetrating. Regarded as a failure, she was reconstructed as a wooden-hulled screw steamer without most of her armor in 1863 and transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, participating in the Battle of Mobile Bay and subsequent siege of Fort Morgan in August 1864. She was briefly transferred to the East Gulf Blockading Squadron, then, after repairs in November, she rejoined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron in March 1865.
Realized $72.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 66

U.S.S. Gamma, Screw Tug, cover addressed to "Henry F. Curtis, Act. Ens., Comdg. U.S.S. Gamma No. 3, Trents Reach, James River, Va.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) neatly tied by a mostly clear Kennebunk, Me. c.d.s., Feb 7 (1865); unobtrusive central spindle hole, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Gamma was a small steamer built in 1863 as steamer R. F. Loper. She was acquired by the Navy in June 1864 and renamed Gamma, though also referred to as Tug Number 3 and Picket Boat Number 3. She was deployed as a picket on the James River and the Carolina Sounds.
Realized $72.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 67

U.S.S. Geranium, Converted Tug Gunboat, exceptionally clean cover addressed to "George E. Norris, Act. 3rd Asst. Engineer, U.S. Str. Geranium, Port Royal", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a light Mar 10 Chelsea, Mass. c.d.s.; reduced slightly at the right, Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Geranium (ex John A. Dix), with a complement of 39 to 45, was commissioned in 1863 and joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She served as a picket, dispatch and light supply ship. She participated in operations on Bull's Bay and diversionary amphibious operations that hastened the evacuation of Charleston.
Realized $150.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 68

U.S.S. Geranium, Converted Tug Gunboat, cover addressed to "Mr. George E. Norris, Act. 3rd Asst. Engineer, U.S. Str. Geranium, Port Royal, S.C.", franked with two 3¢ rose (65) with segmented cork cancels; docketed "Nov 13" with complete details of the letter [not present] in pencil on the reverse; one stamp missing a corner, otherwise Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Geranium (ex John A. Dix), with a complement of 39 to 45, was commissioned in 1863 and joined the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She served as a picket, dispatch and light supply ship. She participated in operations on Bull's Bay and diversionary amphibious operations that hastened the evacuation of Charleston.
Realized $72.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 69

U.S.S. Harriet Lane, Converted Side-Wheel Revenue Cutter, Lady Liberty & George Washington Shield patriotic cover with "The War for the Union" (Weiss E-L 277) with manuscript endorsement "From the U.S. Steamer Harriet Lane", postmarked with a clear "U.S. SHIP/3cts." in circle and sent to Philadelphia; major edge wear, about Fine.
Estimate $500 - 750

Harriet Lane, with a complement of 100, was a converted revenue cutter transferred to the Navy. She fired the first shot of the Naval War April 11, 1861, off Charleston. She served as a mortar boat at New Orleans. On January 1, 1863, she was captured at Galveston Bay.
Realized $1,800.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 70

U.S.S. Hartford, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "From USS Hartford" with additional manuscript "Per Steamer 'Rhode Island" and handstamped "Due 3" and "SHIP" with a bold Philadelphia c.d.s., May 21, 1862, to General Wayne, Pa.; edge wear, about Fine. A rare two-ship cover, the Navy supply ship Rhode Island carrying mail from the sloop-of-war, Hartford, only a few weeks after the capture of New Orleans.
Estimate $150 - 200

At the outbreak of the war the
Hartford was ordered home and in December of 1861, she was fitted out for wartime service and departed from Delaware on January 28, 1862. She served as the flagship of Farragut's West Gulf Blockading Squadron. She dodged a run by the ironclad Manassas and then was grounded near Fort St. Phillip. She fought there and was included at the Battle of New Orleans. On March 14, 1863, she, along with six other ships, attempted to run the batteries at Port Hudson, with only the Hartford and Albatross succeeding. Thereafter they patrolled between Port Hudson and Vicksburg, denying the Confederacy the help of much-needed supplies from the west. She led the Battle of Mobile Bay as Farragut's flagship with four ironclad monitors and 14 wooden vessels. Twelve sailors were awarded the Medal of Honor for service in this battle. In December of 1864 she returned to New York for repairs and in July of 1865 she became the flagship for the Asiatic Squadron and served until 1868. She was recommssioned to serve the Asiatic Squadron in 1872 and served there until 1875. In 1882 she served as flagship of the North Atlantic Squadron until March 1884. She then cruised in the Pacific until decommissioning in 1887 at Mare Island, California, for apprentice sea-training use. She was rebuilt and recommissioned in October 1899, then transferred to the Atlantic coast to be used for a training and cruise ship for midshipmen until October 1912, when she was transferred to Charleston for use as a station ship. She was placed out of commssion in 1926 and eventually towed to Norfolk Navy Yard where she sank at her berth.
Realized $250.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 71

U.S.S. Housatonic, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U. S. S. Housatonic" franked with a pair of 3¢ rose (65) tied two strikes of the scarce undated double-circle "U.S. SHIP" with fleuron (Milgram SH-17), Very Fine. According to Milgram, there are fewer than 25 recorded examples of this particular "U.S. SHIP" handstamp.
Estimate $1,000 - 1,500

Housatonic, with a complement of 160, was commissioned in August 1862 and assigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She operated with the outer Charleston harbor blockade and participated in attacks on Charleston. On February 17, 1864, she became the first ship sunk by a submarine.
Realized $1,500.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 72

U.S.S. Housatonic, Steam Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U. S. S. Housatonic" franked with a pair of 3¢ rose (65) tied by two New York grid duplexes, Nov 19, 1863, to Williamsburgh, L. Island (New York), Very Fine.
Estimate $500 - 750

Housatonic, with a complement of 160, was commissioned in August 1862 and assigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She operated with the outer Charleston harbor blockade and participated in attacks on Charleston. On February 17, 1864, she became the first ship sunk by a submarine.
Realized $550.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 73

U.S.S. Housatonic, Screw Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U. S. S. Housatonic" franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a New York circle-of-wedges duplex, Dec 15, 1862, to Wickford, R.I., Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $500 - 750

Housatonic, with a complement of 160, was commissioned in August 1862 and assigned to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She operated with the outer Charleston harbor blockade and participated in attacks on Charleston. On February 17, 1864, she became the first ship sunk by a submarine.
Realized $375.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 74

U.S.S. Hunchback, Side-Wheel Gunboat, small Lady Liberty with Shield patriotic cover (Weiss F-ST 57a) with manuscript endorsement "Naval letter, U S Stea. Hunchback, Richard Pasquell, Executive Officer", postmarked with a clear New Bern, N.C. c.d.s., Feb 19, 1863 and a bold handstamped "3", to Boston; address somewhat faded, still Very Fine.
Estimate $350 - 500

Hunchback was a side-wheel New York City ferry with a complement of 125. She was purchased in 1861 and converted to a gunboat. Very active in the early operations in the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, she played an important role in the capture of New Bern.
Realized $450.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 75

U.S.S. Itasca, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, cover with printed endorsement "Naval letter, U.S. Gun Boat 'Itasca,' Executive Officer.", franked with a cork-canceled 3¢ rose (65) tied by an incomplete Key West, Fla. c.d.s. with an illegible date, to Great Falls, N.H.; reduced somewhat at the right, otherwise Very Fine. The printed Executive Officer's endorsement negated the need for postage, but a stamp was used anyway.
Estimate $3,500 - 5,000

A VERY RARE PRINTED NAVAL SHIP'S ENDORSEMENT.

Itasca was assigned to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron with a complement of 114. At New Orleans she served the chain blockading Farragut's fleet. She participated in the Lower Mississippi River Campaign, Galveston Blockade and Mobile Bay.
Realized $3,000.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 76

U.S.S. James L. Davis, Bark, cover addressed to "Act. Asst. Surgeon, J.F. Alleyne Adams, U.S.S. 'Jas. L. Davis', East Gulf Squadron, Key West, Florida" franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a mostly clear Portland, Me. target duplex, Aug 25, 1864, and with a clear "DUE/6" handstamp, Fine to Very Fine. Apparently the letter was over half an ounce, requiring another 3¢ postage, and was charged a 2x3¢ penalty.
Estimate $150 - 200

James L. Davis was a bark-rigged, wooden sailing vessel used by the Navy to patrole navigable waterways of the South. She arrived in Cedar Keys, Florida, in March 1862. During her time with the East Gulf Blockading Squadron she served as a blockader, supply ship, troop-landing vessel and conducted raids on salt works.
Realized $150.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 77

U.S.S. Katahdin, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, cover addressed to "Ensign George A. Wauner, Gun-boat Katardin [sic] New Orleans, La.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a partial five-point star-in-circle and postmarked with a Duxbury, Mass. c.d.s., May 16 (1862), Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Katahdin with a complement of 114 passed the forts at New Orleans with Farragut and served on the lower Mississippi. Later she operated on the Texas coast. She was decommissioned in July 1865.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 78

U.S.S. Kearsarge, Screw Sloop of War, cover from station off the Azores via London, England with small manuscript endorsement "From U.S.S. Kearsarge", postmarked on the reverse with a red London c.d.s., Sep 9, 1863 with a red straightline "PACKET LETTER", rated "12/CENTS" Azores to Great Britain, plus 16¢ transatlantic and 5¢ U.S. inland totaling "33" (pence handstamp) or "U.S. NOTES/45" (handstamp) with a Sep 22 "New York Am. Pkt." c.d.s.; addressed to South Braintree, Mass. and "forwarded" (manuscript) to Plymouth with 3¢ forwarding added to the 45¢, making the addressee liable for "Due 48 cts" (manuscript); a fabulous transatlantic civil war naval ship cover, though with major edge wear and some repairing at the right.
Estimate $350 - 500

Kearsage was best known for her defeat of the Confederate Commerce raider Alabama. She was built in 1861 under the American Civil War emergency ship building program, launching on September 11, 1861, and commissioned on January 24, 1862, with Captain Charles Pickering in command.
Realized $400.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 79

U.S.S. Kensington, Screw Steamer, cover with manuscript endorsement "Naval letter from U. S. Str. Kensington", franked with a target-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked New Orleans, Feb 20, 1863, to Milton Mills, N.H., docketed as received Mar 5, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Kensington served from February 1862 to May 1865 with a crew of 72. She was a water supply ship and resupplied Farragut at New Orleans. She delivered water to blockaders off Texas and Louisiana. She also served as a bombardment ship and took or participated in the taking of nine blockade-runners.
Realized $225.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 80

U.S.S. Lodona, Screw Steamer, cover with manuscript endorsement "U. S. S. 'Lodona'" franked with a pair of 3¢ rose (65) tied by two Oct 9 New York grid duplexes, to Williamsburgh, L. I., N.Y.; reduced just a hair at the right, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Lodona was a British steamer that was captured attempting to run the Union blockade in August 1862. She was acquired by the Navy the next month and commissioned in January 1863, joining the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, and decommissioned in May 1865.
Realized $600.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 81

U.S.S. Louisiana, Steel-Hull Screw Steamer, five-page letter datelined "Gun Boat Louisiana, in Pamplico [Pamlico] Sound N.C., July 25, 1864", from a 2nd Asst. Engineer, Hiram Parker, Jr., to his father in Pottsville, Pa., mentioning briefly Jubal Early's July 1864 raid on Washington and noting that they had "picked up 8 refugees men & boys who wished to leave rebeldom & escape the Conscription." and The rebs are taking every male person between 16 & 60 & putting them into the ranks"; the cover is franked with a 3¢ rose (63) tied by a fancy four-point star-in-circle with a partial New York c.d.s., Aug 8, 1864 alongside; cover front & back are separated, the stamp is damaged pre-use and there is a bit of toning, about Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Commissioned in 1861 with a complement of 85,
Louisiana was assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She was stripped, packed with explosives and detonated in front of Fort Fisher. As experts predicted, there was little effect on the fort.
Realized $70.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 82

U.S.S. Marblehead, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "Naval letter, G C (…?), 1st Lieut., Gun boat Marblehead", postmarked with straightline "U. S. SHIP" and "Due 6" handstamps and a mostly complete Philadelphia c.d.s., Jan 5, 1863, to Benton, N.J.; reduced slightly at the left and ink smeared during endorsing/addressing, otherwise Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Marblehead, with a complement of 114, served blockade duty with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from 1861 to mid-1864 when she was assigned a Naval Academy Training Ship. For the remainder of the war she alternated between the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron duties and as a training ship.
Realized $70.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 83

S.S. Marcia Greenleaf Brig, cover addressed to "Lieut. John N. Partridge, Co. D. 24th Re't. Mass. Vols., Gen. Burnside's Division, Care Storeship 'Marcia Greenleaf', Old Point Comfort, Va.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a small boxed "PAID" and postmarked with a red Boston c.d.s., Apr 28 (1862); small nick at the top edge, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Marcia Greenleaf was a store ship leased for 11 months to support the Peninsula Campaign. She was named for the owner's wife, who lived on board and witnessed the Monitor and Virigina engagement. After her husband's death, she moved to Arizona where she served as Post Master at Fort Apache for the last 15 years of her life.
Realized $70.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 84

U.S.S. Massachusetts, Steel-Hull Screw Steamer, cover with manuscript endorsement "From Steamer Massachusetts" postmarked with a mostly clear "U.S. SHIP/3cts." in circle, to Taunton, Mass.; dated in pencel on the reverse "11/26/61", Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Massachusetts, with a complement of 112, drove the Confederates from Ship Island and secured it as the Navy's West Gulf operational base. She was Fort Massachusetts' namesake.
Realized $275.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 85

U.S.S. Mercedita, Screw Steamer Gunboat, illustrated cover with printed endorsement "Ship's Letter, U.S.S. Mercedita" and a three-color Patriotic illustration of Mercedita flying the Colors and a "Mercedita" pennant; postmarked with a clear New York c.d.s., Dec 15, 1862, and a manuscript "Due 3"; reduced slightly at the right with several opening tears at the top. One of three different styles of printed covers from Mercedita, this one illustrated in an article by Richard Graham in the February 1989 issue of The Chronicle..
Estimate $1,500 - 2,000

Mercedita was commissioned December 8, 1861, and joined the Gulf Blockading Squadron. She destroyed Confederate batteries at St. Vincent Island, FL, and worked with the Sagamore to cature Apalachicola. She then captured blockade runner Bermuda and schooners Victoria and Ida. She then transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron and served on the blockade of Charleston until the end of January 1863. In April of that year she joined the West Indies Squadron to escort California steamers and later joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron operating in Beaufort, NC, for the remainder of 1864. She joined the West Gulf Squadron in March of 1865 and was then decommissioned and sold in late 1865.
Realized $2,200.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 86

U.S.S. Miami, Side-Wheel Gunboat, Flag & Cannon patriotic cover with "BABY WAKER" patriotic cover (Weiss F-R 400) with manuscript endorsement "From USS Gun Boat Miami", postmarked large blue crayon "3" and handstamped oblong-boxed "SHIP" & "3", to Philadelphia; reduced somewhat at the right with a slightly repaired edge plus a light central file fold, Fine to Very Fine appearance.
Estimate $250 - 350

Miamii, with a complement of 134, took part in the Battle of New Orleans and the investment of Vicksburg before transfer to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She was the flagship for the fleet at Roanoke Island and finished the war on the James river supporting Grant's drive on Richmond.
Realized $275.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 87

U.S.S. Mingoe, Side-Wheel Sloop, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Mingoe'", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a four-point star-in-circle and an incomplete New-York c.d.s., to Williamsburgh, L.I., N.Y.; reduced slightly at the right, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Mingoe, with a complement of 137, was commissioned less than one year serving blockade duty off Charleston and on the St. John's River with the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
Realized $130.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 88

U.S.S. Mingoe, Double-Ended, Side-Wheel, Ironclad Gunboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. 'Mingoe'", franked with a cork-canceled pair of 3¢ rose (65) very faint, incomplete (Mar 12?) New York c.d.s. alongside, to Williamsburgh, L.I., N.Y., Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Mingoe, with a complement of 137, was commissioned less than one year serving blockade duty off Charleston and on the St. John's River with the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
Realized $130.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 89

U.S.S. Mississippi, Side-Wheel Frigate, Flag and "Long May It Wave" patriotic cover (Weiss F-R 87) with manuscript endorsement "From U S Frigate Mississippi", postmarked with a clear "New-York Ship Letter/ 5/ Jun/ 26" c.d.s., indicating carriage by a non-contract ship, to Abington, Mass.; opening tears at the top, otherwise Very Fine.
Estimate $350 - 500

Mississippi was Commodore Mathew Perry's flagship for his historic mission to open Japan. At New Orleans, after passing Forts Jackson and St. Phillip, she ran the Conderate ram Manassas ashore, wrecking her with two broadsides. She was ordered upriver for the operations against Port Hudson, where she grounded and was fired by her crew to prevent capture.
Realized $250.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 90

U.S.S. Mississippi, Side-Wheel Frigate, cover with manuscript endorsement "From U S Frigate Mississippi", postmarked with a clear "U.S. SHIP/3 cts." oval due handstamp, to Abington, Mass.; reduced somewhat at the left with a small tear at the bottom minor back damage, otherwise Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Mississippi was Commodore Mathew Perry's flagship for his historic mission to open Japan. At New Orleans, after passing Forts Jackson and St. Phillip, she ran the Conderate ram Manassas ashore, wrecking her with two broadsides. She was ordered upriver for the operations against Port Hudson, where she grounded and was fired by her crew to prevent capture.
Realized $300.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 91

U.S.S. Montauk, Passaic-Class Monitor, cover with manuscript endorsement "Naval Letter" and "From U.S. Iron Clad 'Montauk'", handstamped "DUE/6" in circle with a Feb 24 Old Point Comfort, Va. c.d.s., to Washington D.C.; reduced a bit with a small tear at the right and a slightly rounded upper right corner, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Montauk was one of Du Pont's ironclads that attacked the forts in Charleston harbor. With Captain John Worden commanding, she destroyed the raider Rattlesnake. She served as a floting bier for assassin John Wilkes Booth on April 27 and a floating prison for six accomplices.
Realized $130.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 92

U.S.S. Neptune, Screw Steamer, 3¢ pink entire (U59) with manuscript endorsement "U.S. Steamer Neptune", canceled with straightline "SHI(P)" and "Due 6 cts." handstamps and a red Apr 27 c.d.s., to Mohigan, R.I.; reduced at the right, Fine to Very Fine. Postage should have been 3¢ to Boston plus 3¢ inland; the underpayment of 3¢ was doubled as a penalty.
Estimate $150 - 200

Neptune was commissioned in January 1864 with a complement of 173. She was assigned to the West Indies Squadron and primarily served convoying steamers bound to and from California.
Realized $450.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 93

U.S.S. Niagara, Screw Frigate, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. Flag Ship Niagara, Key West July 25th", handstamped straightline "SHIP" with manuscript "3" and postmarked with a Philadelphia octagonal datestamp, Aug 5, 1861, to Kingston, R.I., Very Fine.
Estimate $250 - 350

Prior to the war
Niagara participated in laying the first Trans-Atlantic Cable. She served as flagship for the Gulf Blockading Squadron, then the East Gulf Blockading Squadron until June 1862. After refit, she patrolled for CSA warships outfitting in Europe. In 1864-65 she was stationed out of Antwerp, Belgium, searching the English Channel and Bay of Biscay for raiders. She captured the Georgia in August 1864.
Realized $550.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 94

U.S.S. Niagara, Screw Frigate, cover addressed to "Mr. Brevill Melins, U S Frigate Niagara, Antwerp, Belgium, in care of the American Conns" [Consul], franked with four 10¢ green & a 2¢ black (68, 73), pen canceled, the 2¢ tied by a red "NEW PAID YORK/24" c.d.s., Dec 31 (1864), three of the four 10¢ by a manuscript "10" rate; with a French entry c.d.s. (Jan 13) and a faded boxed "P.D."; forwarded to Vlissingen, Holland with France par Mous, Antwerp & Vlissingen backstamps, the last very faint; 2¢ stamp with a small tear, cover with some soiling (heavier on the reverse), Fine. 42¢ was the rate for a half-ounce letter to Belgium via France.
Estimate $200 - 300

Prior to the war
Niagara participated in laying the first Trans-Atlantic Cable. She served as flagship for the Gulf Blockading Squadron, then the East Gulf Blockading Squadron until June 1862. After refit, she patrolled for CSA warships outfitting in Europe. In 1864-65 she was stationed out of Antwerp, Belgium, searching the English Channel and Bay of Biscay for raiders. She captured the Georgia in August 1864.
Realized $225.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 95

U.S.S. Octorara, Double-End Side-Wheel Steamer, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. Octorara, Mobile Bay" and "Politeness of Mr. J.H. Chapman" to Mrs. R.B. Plotts in New Orleans; there are no postal markings, thus indicating that the cover was probably hand-carried by Mr. Chapman, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

The family correspondence of naval engineer, Rezeau B. Plotts, is well known. This letter was written sometime after
Octarara's participation in the Battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. She continued to operate in and around Mobile until July 1865, firing on fortifications and taking part in the capture of the city on April 12, 1865.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 96

U.S.S. Octorara, Double-End Side-Wheel Steamer, cover with manuscript endorsement "U.S.S. Octorara, Mobile Bay" to Mrs. R.B. Plotts in New Orleans, "Care of Philip P. Eastwick U.S.N., Fleet Engineers Office"; the lack of postal markings suggests that the cover was hand-carried, perhaps with other dispatches; most of top flap missing, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

The family correspondence of naval engineer, Rezeau B. Plotts, is well known. This letter was written sometime after
Octarara's participation in the Battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. She continued to operate in and around Mobile until July 1865, firing on fortifications and taking part in the capture of the city on April 12, 1865.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 97

U.S.S. Ohio, Ship of the Line, colorless embossed corner card "U.S. REC'G. SHIP OHIO/ PAYMASTER'S DEPT./ OFFICIAL BUSINESS" on an exceptionally clean cover to "A. A. Surgeon, D.P. Goodhue, U.S. Recg Ship Ohio, Navy Yard, New York", franked with a neatly grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a clear red Charlestown, Mass. c.d.s., Feb 1, 1864, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Ohio was launched in 1820 but not placed in service until 1838. She served in the Mexican-American war and briefly as flagship of the Pacific Squadron. She spent most of her career as the receiving ship at Boston Naval Yard. Her size made her well-suited for the role.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 98

U.S.S. Patroon, Screw Steamer, cover addressed to "Saml. G. Hayter, Masters Mate, U.S. Steamer Patroon, St. Johns River, Flo., South Atlantic Blockading Squadron" and "If gone elsewhere please forward"; franked with 1¢ blue & 3¢ rose (63, 65) (the 1¢ for Carrier pick-up) tied by a partial Aug New York target duplex; opened roughly at the left, damaging the 3¢ stamp, otherwise Fine. A very rare cover due to the fact that the Patroon carried a crew of only 49 and was only in service for eight months., Ex-Walske.
Estimate $200 - 300

Patroon was commissioned in March 1862 and with a complement of 49 served the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron off the St. John's River in Florida. She was plagued by leaking and a range of other problems and was sent north. After only eight months of service she was decommissioned in Philadelphia in November of the same year at which time Masters Mate Hayter also resigned from the Navy.
Realized $200.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 99

U.S.S. Penobscot, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, cover with manuscript endorsement "U. S. Gunboat Penobscot" and "New Orleans, May 1864", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a New Orleans target duplex, May 17 '64, to Philadelphia and handstamped "DUE/6" in circle, Very Fine.
Estimate $250 - 350

Penobscot, with a crew of 114, was initially assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron but in late 1863 she was transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. She primarily operated along the Texas coast, including off Matagorda, Mexico, and Galveston Bay to as far as Aransas Pass.
Realized $300.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 100

U.S.S. Philadelphia, Side-Wheel Steamer, cover from Philadelphia to New York postmarked bold straightline "U.S. SHIP" with a four-page letter datelined "U.S Ship Philadelphia, Sep 3" and signed "W.A. Wilson, U.S. Flag Steamer Philadelphia, Port Royal, S.C."; cover franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and Philadelphia c.d.s., Sep 16, 1864. The letter is written in pencil, some of it very light and difficult to read, but in it Wilson talks about preferring not to seek a promotion to Masters Mate because the pay is too small and because "Admiral Dahgren and the Fleet Doct Johnson have promised to do some thing for me." And he notes that Beaufort, S.C. is "the prettiest and nicest city I ever was in" but that the handsome houses and hotels are all deserted and "there is nobody there but Nigers and soldiers", Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Philadelphia was a trading vessel with a complement of only 24 operating on the Upper Potomac until seized at the outbreak of the war and outfitted as a Naval ship. She operated on the Potomac River as a supply ship, ordinance transport ship and troop transport until transferred to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She was then transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron where she served as its flagship under Rear Admiral Dahlgren from August 1863 through 1865. In 1863 she participated in the operations against Charleston.
Realized $250.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 101

U.S.S. Potomac, Frigate, cover addressed to "Nathaniel T. Hamlin, U. S. Ship Potomac, Pensacola, Fla.", franked with a neatly cork-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a red Boston c.d.s., Nov 6 (1864); includes a five-page family letter in which the recipient's sister writes "of the coming election. It appears that one party are determined to elect Lincoln while another are bent on McLellan [sic] and the consequence is that the Military have been called out to guard the public buildings. The Police force have been doubled and every thing put in readiness for a defense"; cover with a few opening tears at the top with top flap missing, otherwise Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Potomac, with a complement of 480, was commissioned in 1830. She served with the Pacific and Brazilian Squadrons before becoming the flagship of the Home Squadron. At the start of the war she was assigned to the Gulf Blockading Squadron, later becoming a store ship, and then the receiving ship for the East Gulf Blockading Squadron at Pensacola.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 102

U.S.S. Powhatan, Steam Frigate, cover with manuscript endorsement "From U.S.F.S. Powhatan", franked with a 10¢ green (68) tied by a light undated circle "N. YORK/ STEAMSHIP", to Lawrence, Mass., Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Powhatan was one of the Navy's most powerful ships. In 1861 under the command of Lt. David Dixon Porter, she assisted in the relief of Fort Pickens, Florida. She participated in the reduction of Fort Fisher December 24-25, 1864, and its capture January 13-15, 1865.
Realized $150.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 103

U.S.S. Pursuit, Bark, cover addressed to "Henri Batchelder, U.S. Barque Pursuit, St Josephs Bay, Florida, Care Naval Lyceum, Brooklyn, N.Y.", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with an Aug 8 Holliston, Mass. c.d.s.; the cover apparently went to Brooklyn first and was handstamped with a small oblong-boxed "FORWARDED" and "DUE 3", then there is a Sep 1, 1862(?) Port Royal, S.C. c.d.s., a Sep 17 "ADVERTISED" oval, a "CANNOT BE FOUND" straightline and, finally, a Dec 16 New York backstamp, Fine to Very Fine and most unusual.
Estimate $250 - 350

Pursuit, with a complement of 100, was a barque acquired in 1861. She operated on the east coast of Florida as far as Cuba performing blockade operations.
Realized $375.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 104

U.S.S. Rachel Seaman, Schooner Gunboat, George Washington on Horseback with Flag and "'Imitate Him!' 'Be a Patriot!'" patriotic cover (Weiss FP-GW 84 with an unlisted verse) with manuscript endorsement "Naval letter, Gunboat R. Seaman, Q.A. Hooper, Comm", postmarked with a mostly clear "U.S. SHIP/3cts." circle, to Philadelphia; reduced somewhat at the right, Fine to Very Fine. A somewhat unusual, properly certified sailor's letter, actually signed by the commanding officer, as postal regulations required.
Estimate $600 - 800

Rachel Seaman was used as a gunboat reporting to the Gulf Blockading Squadron, then the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. She primarily served blockade duty operating off the coast of Texas. She briefly operated off Mobile before returning to the Texas coast.
Realized $1,100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 105

U.S.S. Red Rover, Side-Wheel Hospital Ship, cover addressed to "Symmes E. Browne, Ensign, Gunboat Signal, Western Flotilla, Cairo, Ill." and redirected to "Hospital. Red. Rover, franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Cincinnati grid duplex, May 26 (1863); backstamped with a large "RECEIVED/*CAIRO Ill*" c.d.s., May 28, 1863 and docketed "Recd, Red Rover, June 14, 1863"; reduced just a tad at the right, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Red Rover was the U.S. Navy's first hospital ship and the first ship to have female nurses, forerunner of the Navy Nurses Corps. Fleet Surgeon Pinckney installed strict health standards on day-to-day activities as the ship treated more thant 2400 patients. She provided medical support at Vicksburg.
Realized $400.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 106

U.S.S. Rhode Island, Side-Wheel Steamer, small cover to Boston from Haiti with letter datelined "U.S. Str. Rhode Island, Cape Haitien, Thursday evening, Dec 31st '63"; cover postmarked with a New York "STEAMSHIP/20" circle and a small Jan 29 Boston receiver; the ten-page letter, written over a ten-day period, is from Naval doctor S. Gilbert Webber to his fiancée.
Estimate $300 - 400

Rhode Island was built in 1860 as the John P. King, then renamed Eagle in early 1861 after being partly destroyed by a fire. She was purchased by the Navy in June 1861 and commissioned as Rhode Island the following month. In December 1862, she was detailed to tow the ironclad, U.S.S. Monitor, south from Hampton Roads, Va. to Port Royal, S.C. On the way the ships encountered a heavy storm and Monitor, with multiple underwater leaks, sank before her crew could be completely transferred to Rhode Island, taking four officers and 12 enlisted men with her. In January 1863 Rhode Island joined the West Indies Squadron.
Realized $190.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 107

U.S.S. Roanoke, Ironclad Monitor, tiny cover with manuscript endorsement "Ship Letter Frigate 'Roanoke', No (…?)", handstamped blue "DUE/3" in circle with a partial blue Baltimore c.d.s. Sep 8 (1864), to New York; includes the original note datelined "Fort Monroe, Va. Sep 7/64", Very Fine. When this was written, Roanoke had been converted to a Monitor, but apparently her crew still referred to her as a Frigate.
Estimate $200 - 300

Roanoke started life as a Merrimack steam frigate but after Hampton Roads was converted to a three-turret (one forward, two aft) ironclad Monitor. It was a bad conversion—the ship leaked badly and rolled so much as not to be able to fire at sea. The first test firing of her guns resulted in the dismounting of three of them. With a crew of 347, she served at Hampton Roads providing harbor protection.
Realized $130.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 108

U.S.S. Saint Lawrence, Frigate, cover addressed to "Fleet Surgeon Harner, on board the U.S. Ship St. Lawrence, Keywest, Florida", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Philadelphia c.d.s., Mar 10, 1863, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

St. Lawrence served with the Atlantic and South Atlantic Blockading Squadrons before joining the North Atlantic Blockading Squadrons where, while grounded, she was one of the ships to engage Virginia at Hampton Roads on March 9. Her weapons were no match for Virigina's armor while she was holed just above the waterline. Virginia retired for the day with the intent of destroying her in the morning. In July 1862 she became the flagship of the East Gulf Blockading Squadron where she patrolled off the coast of Florida looking for blockade-runners operating between Cuba and the Gulf Coast. She continued in this capacity until an outbreak of Yellow Fever caused her to return north. In 1863 she was refit as an ordinance ship assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
Realized $180.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 109

U.S.S. Saranac, Side-Wheel Sloop of War, cover with manuscript endorsement "From U.S. Stm'r 'Saranac', Pacific Squadron", postmarked Vallejo, Cal. (Nov) 27 (1865) and franked with a 10¢ green (68) canceled with red circle-of-Vs; to Johnson, Vt.; includes the original letter datelined "Off San Francisco, U.S. Stm'r 'Saranac', Oct 1st 1864" from Ship's Corporal, Richard Fisher, to his father, with excellent content about possible promotions and about his tours in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Canton, Ning Po and "up the Yiang Tse to Hangkow", including, "After which I joined the Chinese Army…and was employed by the Mandarine to take charge of and drill a quantity of Chinese in the manual exercise of small arms." The cover also bears a small patriotic label: "The Union, - Northern Grit, will save it free.", letter Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Saranac was assigned to the Pacific Squadron protecting American commerce along the coast of California. She was tasked with searching for the raider CSS Shenandoah, the last belligerent of the war.
Realized $650.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 110

U.S.S. Saranac, Side-Wheel Sloop of War, cover with manuscript endorsement "From U.S. Str. Saranac, Acapulco, Mex.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a straightline "STEAM/SHIP" with "Due7" and "7" handstamps, to Chelsea, Mass.; opening tears at the top, stamp slightly damaged, Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Saranac was assigned to the Pacific Squadron protecting American commerce along the coast of California. She was tasked with searching for the raider CSS Shenandoah, the last belligerent of the war.
Realized $160.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 111

U.S.S. Satellite, Converted Tug Gunboat, Indian, Sailor & Shield patriotic cover in bronze (Weiss M-T 8a var.) with manuscript endorsement "U.S. Steamer Satellite Jan 19th", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a Jan 24 Washington D.C. c.d.s.; reduced somewhat at the right removing part of stamp, otherwise Fine to Very Fine. Satellite was only in service for two years, that, when combined with the small size of her crew—and the fact that it's on a patriotic envelope—makes this a very rare cover.
Estimate $300 - 400

Satellite was commissioned in September 1861 with a complement of 43. She was assigned to the Potomac Flotilla supporting Army operations. She was captured and destroyed in August 1863.
Realized $350.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 112

U.S.S. Sciota, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, Waving Flag with Liberty Cap patriotic cover with Everbell's Sons imprint (Weiss F-R 304 var.) with manuscript endorsement "Ship letter, US Gunboat Sciota" postmarked straightline "SHIP" and "U.S. SHIP/3cts." in circle, indicating it was first rated as a non-contract ship letter due 5¢ then reclassified as a sailor's letter due 3¢; reduced slightly at the right, Very Fine.
Estimate $200 - 300

Sciota, with a complement of 114, was at New Orleans and took part in the lower Mississippi River operations. Afterwards she performed general blockade duties and had the infamous distinction of being sunk twice but successfully salvaged both times.
Realized $550.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 113

U.S.S. Sebago, Side-Wheel Sloop, cover addressed to "Surgn T.M. Coan M.D., U.S. Steamer Sebago, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, New Orleans, La.", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by one of two strikes of a New York four-point star-in-circle duplex, Dec 14 (1864 - docketed as received "Jan. 6/65"), Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Sebago was commissioned in 1862 and supported the Peninsula campaign. She served with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron and the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron before joining the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. She participated in the Battle of Mobile Bay.
Realized $350.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 114

U.S.S. Southfield, Side-Wheel Gunboat, cover with small printed endorsement "NAVAL LETTER, U. S. STR. 'SOUTHFIELD'" (Milgram 1291), franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a blue Norfolk, Va. target duplex, Oct 14, 1863; with pre-printed address to "Mr. Henry M. Lowe, Rockport, Mass."; small, light soiled spot at the top and bottom edges, otherwise Very Fine.
Estimate $500 - 750

Southfield, with a complement of 61, was a converted ferry purchased in 1861. She operated in the Albemarle and Pamlico sounds with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron until sunk by the CSS Albemarle.
Realized $600.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 115

U.S.S. Sumpter, Screw Steamer, cover with manuscript endorsement "Naval letter (signed) N.B. Juby, 1st Lieutenant, U.S. Steamer Sumpter", postmarked with a straightline "Due 3" and a Jul 9 Port Royal, S.C. c.d.s., to East Wareham, Mass.; reduced slightly at the left, Very Fine. The year would have been 1862, as she was assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron early in 1863. A rare cover due to her fairly small crew and her short term of service.
Estimate $200 - 300

Sumpter, with a complement of 64, participated at Fernandina, Florida, and operated off Charleston taking the British blockade runner Emil St. Pierre. In late 1862 she returned to NY Shipyard and was then reassigned from the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. On June 24, 1863, Sumpter collided with the Union transport, U.S.S. General Meigs near the Smith Island lighthouse and sank, her entire crew being rescued by the U.S.S. Jamestown.
Realized $600.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 116

U.S.S. Sweet Brier, Screw Tug, cover addressed to "Mr. Martin V. B. Darling, Act. 2nd Asst Engineer, U.S.S. Sweet Brier, Port Royal, S.C.", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a red Providence, R.I. c.d.s., May 30, 1864; stamp with minor faults, Very Fine. A very rare cover due to Sweet Brier's small crew size and short term of service.
Estimate $150 - 200

Sweet Brier, with a complement of 37, served in the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from her commissioning in 1864 until July 1865. She primarily operated off Charleston.
Realized $100.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 117

U.S.S. Vincennes, Sloop, Lady Liberty & Flag patriotic cover (Weiss F-F 122) addressed to "Mr. Augustus O. Goodsoe, U.S. Sloop Vincennes, Gulf Squadron (In care of New York Naval Lyceum)", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a neat Oct 7 Portsmouth, N.H. c.d.s.; reduced a bit irregularly at the right, otherwise Very Fine.
Estimate $300 - 400

Vincennes had been Wilkes' flagship for his Antarctic Surveying and Exploring Expedition. In the war she served blockade duty and commanded the blockade off Ship Island.
Realized $400.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 118

U.S.S. Wabash, Colorado Class Screw Frigate, cover addressed to "George Clymer Esqr. M.D., U.S. Flag Ship Wabash, Hilton-Head, South Carolina" and "Via New York", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a weak Wellsboro, Pa. c.d.s., docketed "Recd. Off St. Augustine by the Keystone State from P.R. [Port Royal] March 12"; includes original 4½-page letter from William B. Shubrick Clymer datelined Wellsboro, Feb 18, 1862, with the added half-sheet containing the "money quote":

"The only time I ever saw Jefferson Davis was in Ap. '46 in the Senate. You pointed him out to me. Crittenden called up a bill for cleaning obstructions at the mouth of Cumberland River."…"Davis opposed the bill. Calhoun replied in favor of it. Davis answered & Calhoun rejoined. I Thought Davis's Constitutional objections very frivolous. He seemed a dwarf in the hands of Calhoun. I have never thought much of Davis since.", Very Fine.
Estimate $400 - 600

Wabash was the flagship of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron who spearheaded the assault on Port Royal. In December 1864 she rejoined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron for the two battles of Fort fisher.

The well-known and extensive Clymer Correspondence documents the United States Navy during the early and mid-nineteenth century, especially naval medicine, diplomacy, and rank. The bulk of the collection is housed in the Princeton University Library with very few examples being held in private hands
.
Realized $375.
View details and enlarged photos
Lot 119

U.S.S. Wabash, Colorado Class Screw Frigate, cover with printed endorsement "U. S .S. Wabash, N. A. B. Squadron", franked with a cork-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a Dec 4 Old Point Comfort, Va. c.d.s., to New York City, Very Fine. Quite rare., with a 1998 A.P.S. certificate.
Estimate $300 - 400

Wabash, with a complement of 672, was flagship of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She took part in the capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark. On October 29, 1861, she was desginated the flagship of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron and sailed south to spearhead the assault on Port Royal, which would be the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron's new headquarters.
Realized $550.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 120

U.S.S. Wabash, Colorado Class Screw Frigate, 3¢ pink entire (U58) with manuscript endorsement " U.S.S. Wabash" canceled with an Old Point Comfort, Va. c.d.s., Oct 29 (1861) - Wabash's first day as Flagship of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron - and addressed to Commodore P.F. (…) [surname crossed out], Annapolis, Maryland; rough opening at the top affecting the endorsement, otherwise Fine to Very Fine. Postal stationery was not often used aboard ships; that, coupled with the significant date for Wabash, make this very rare indeed.
Estimate $150 - 200

Wabash, with a complement of 672, was flagship of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron. She took part in the capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark. On October 29, 1861, she was desginated the flagship of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron and sailed south to spearhead the assault on Port Royal, which would be the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron's new headquarters.
Realized $72.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 121

U.S.S. Wachusett, Screw Sloop, cover addressed to "Acting Master Fred D. Stuart, U.S. Flag Ship Wachusett, West India Squadron, Rear Admiral C. Wilkes Commanding, Care of U.S. Consul, Havana, Cuba", franked with a 10¢ green (68) tied by an illegible town cancel with a red "New Paid York" c.d.s., Feb 2 (1862) and an oval "NA1" (1 real due) handstamp, backstamped Havana on Feb 10; reduced just a hair at the top, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Wachusett, with a complement of 123, was designated flagship of the West Indies Blockading Squadron in 1862. She searched for Alabama and Florida, capturing the latter in the neutral harbor of Bahia, Brazil, in 1864.
Realized $200.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 122

U.S.S. Warren, Sloop of War, cover with manuscript endorsement "U S Ship Warren, Bay of Panama, U S of Columbia [sic]", franked with a 10¢ green (68) tied by a "N. YORK/STEAMSHIP" circle with a handstamped "Due 10", to Captain Thomas Brown, George Town, DC; reduced just a tad at the left, Very Fine. This usage would have been between September 1861 and January 1863 when Warren was sold. The 10¢ due reflects the 20¢ rate from Panama.
Estimate $350 - 500

The fourth
Warren launched in 1827. She started her career in the Mediterranean, successfully protecting American shipping. She served in the Brazilian, West Indies and Pacific squadrons, then became a Store Ship for the Pacific Fleet at the Bay of Panama in the 1850s.
Realized $450.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 123

U.S.S. William G. Anderson, Bark, cover with manuscript endorsement "From USShip W.G. Anderson, West Gulf Blkdg Squadrn", franked with a grid-canceled 3¢ rose (65) and postmark Old Point Comfort, Va., Oct 10 (faintly docketed at left "Aug.(?!) 26, 1862"); reduced just a tad at the left, Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

William G. Anderson operated with the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. She captured the privateer Beauregard and took eight prize ships during the war. She was decommissioned in 1866 and sold.
Realized $650.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 124

U.S.S. Wissahickon, Unadilla-Class Gunboat, small cover with manuscript endorsement "From U.S.S. 'Wissahickon'", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) and postmarked with a straightline "U. S. SHIP", to Taunton, Mass., the stamp tied by the fancy Shield killer of Taunton (Skinner-Eno PS-ST 18); "7/21/63" penciled date on reverse, Fine to Very Fine.
Estimate $150 - 200

Wissahickon participated in the capture of New Orleans, bombardment of Grand Gulf, and two runs past the Confederate fortifications commanding the river at Vicksburg.
Realized $160.
View details and enlarged photo
Lot 125

U.S.S. Young Rover, Bark, Sailor with Eagle, Flag & Shield and "The Pride of the Nation" patriotic cover (Weiss M-F 72 var. - unlisted verse) with manuscript endorsement "from the U S S Yong [sic] Rover ", franked with a 3¢ rose (65) tied by a rimless Annapolis, Md. c.d.s., Mar 6 (1863); reduced just a bit at the right, Fine to Very Fine. Annapolis is an uncommon entry point for ship's mail, but the date corresponds to the time Young Rover would have been in transit to Baltimore for repairs prior to joining the Potomac River Flotilla.
Estimate $500 - 750

Young Rover, with a complement of 48, served with the East Gulf Blockading Squadron, the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron and the Potomac Flotilla. Her last assignment was guarding the approaches to Delaware bay against Confederate raiders.
Realized $1,000.
View details and enlarged photo








Daniel F. Kelleher Auctions, LLC
The Oldest Philatelic Auction House in the United States, established in 1885.
 
Administrative Office:
22 Shelter Rock Lane, Unit 53
Danbury, CT 06810, USA

Tel: 203.830.2500
Fax: 203.297.6059
  Boston Area Office:
181 Wells Avenue, Suite 105
Newton, MA 02459, USA

Tel: 781.453.0990
Fax: 781.453.0945
 

info@kelleherauctions.com

 

payments accepted via:

 

follow us on: